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Repair a very old vertical drilling machine

Tom Kitta

Ultra Member
What you could try maybe for your next project is to mix epoxy with some shavings from cast iron. This way where you use it to fill in the holes it does not look so obvious that it is a filler. I have not tried this trick yet - but at least in theory it sounds plausible.
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Repair and polish - Repair and polish, repeat N times

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The center is opened to form a 32mm hole for clamping the slender shaft
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The gear change handle module is polished and cleaned together
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Try paint jobs (using pressure tank paint), cure quickly, and try other colors with ----
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Multiple spraying makes the surface smoother and more beautiful
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After installation look at the color collocation is still good
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Green paint dries very slowly and takes a lot of time. It's a bit edgy!!
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Assemble the gearbox
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Repair the spline shaft and make a simple collet so you don't have to replace the four claws.
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A damaged section is excised
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QQ截图20230603134314.jpg
Weld a new section of steel
QQ截图20230603134700.jpg

Turning the outer circle ----- turning thread ---- is completed
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Janger

(John)
Administrator
Vendor
Quite the project. Seems like every part on this drill press needs work. You'll have a wonderful tool when done.
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Take the time to make a yard canopy and attach a gantry mid-shelf as part of the canopy

Find a piece of H steel, the length is slightly short, can only be welded to extend it, first cut the type C interface, and polish the welding impurities
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Butt seam welding
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Get a patch to reinforce it
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Excuse me professional welder: the patch does not add welding wire, belong to the weld edge welding together, whether there is enough strength??

This is 200*100 type H steel, the lifting is planned to be 0.5T, does it need to be reinforced??
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Quite the project. Seems like every part on this drill press needs work. You'll have a wonderful tool when done.
Yes, almost every part had to be repaired. It was a bad purchase. It took me too much time. Serious error of judgment ---- Although it is very cheap, my only satisfaction is that it gives me a chance to learn a new mechanical structure ----- whoo
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Get a patch to reinforce it

I won't comment at all on your gantry crane plans, but I will comment on your I-Beam repair. It important to remember that the strength of an I-Beam is mostly determined by the size of the flanges and by their separation, not by the size of the web separating them. The reinforcing plate that you added to the web probably adds very little to the overall strength of the beam. If you calculate the moment of area for the beam, which determines its strength, you will see what I mean.

If you are worried about the strength of the repair, I would add plates to the top and bottom flanges instead. (You do not have to remove the plates on the web.) If you plan to use a trolley, add the plates to the other side of the flange so they don't interfere with the trolley wheels. It doesn't matter very much which side of each flange it is added to.
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Vendor
Hi A Smile. I recommend you should find a local welder to inspect the welds. To me - and I mean no offence - they appear to bridge too much air space, are full of porosity, and don't look like the weld heating zone has penetrated deep into the metal. I expect those welds will fail. I am not a qualified welder - and I think you should find one for a hands on inspection.

What is the thickness of the metal? How many amps and what voltage was used to do the welding?

I think you should cut that weld out and do a very straight cut on both sides. Abandon the tricky cut. This would allow the material to be butted together touching all along. A v-groove may be required. Clamp it tight together. Tack weld in places and then weld the seam. Then apply patches to reinforce the flanges. I don't know though this is just a possible approach.

I know we have some pro welders on here - can any of you provide better advice?
@johnnielsen ? TIG? Stick? MIG? Rod type? Amps and Voltage?
 
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a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
I won't comment at all on your gantry crane plans, but I will comment on your I-Beam repair. It important to remember that the strength of an I-Beam is mostly determined by the size of the flanges and by their separation, not by the size of the web separating them. The reinforcing plate that you added to the web probably adds very little to the overall strength of the beam. If you calculate the moment of area for the beam, which determines its strength, you will see what I mean.

If you are worried about the strength of the repair, I would add plates to the top and bottom flanges instead. (You do not have to remove the plates on the web.) If you plan to use a trolley, add the plates to the other side of the flange so they don't interfere with the trolley wheels. It doesn't matter very much which side of each flange it is added to.
I know what you mean, adding a patch to the abdomen for stress is best ---- thank you
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Hi A Smile. I recommend you should find a local welder to inspect the welds. To me - and I mean no offence - they appear to bridge too much air space, are full of porosity, and don't look like the weld heating zone has penetrated deep into the metal. I expect those welds will fail. I am not a qualified welder - and I think you should find one for a hands on inspection.

What is the thickness of the metal? How many amps and what voltage was used to do the welding?

I think you should cut that weld out and do a very straight cut on both sides. Abandon the tricky cut. This would allow the material to be butted together touching all along. A v-groove may be required. Clamp it tight together. Tack weld in places and then weld the seam. Then apply patches to reinforce the flanges. I don't know though this is just a possible approach.

I know we have some pro welders on here - can any of you provide better advice?
@johnnielsen ? TIG? Stick? MIG? Rod type? Amps and Voltage?
Thank you for your advice. I will find a professional welder to evaluate the welding quality.

There must be pores, because the requirements are not very high, so I don't have a lot of patience to polish, but I think the welding heat is enough to weld the welding material, it should be because the welding current is very concentrated, the heat diffusion range is relatively small, which makes people illusion, the current 150A- I am not professional opinion - is enough
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Vendor
A. Smile I found the reference pages for tig welding beveled butt joints. This is for the reference text the procedure handbook of arc welding. You can see they recommend 4 weld passes for 1/4” (6mm) thick material joints with a steel backing.
 

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a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
A. Smile I found the reference pages for tig welding beveled butt joints. This is for the reference text the procedure handbook of arc welding. You can see they recommend 4 weld passes for 1/4” (6mm) thick material joints with a steel backing.

Thank you for your welding parameter manual. Since I am not a professional welder, I can only watch videos to quickly learn simple welding techniques. For safety, I usually downgrade the use.

I have no professional training in welding, so I will not do some pressure, explosion-proof welding, to their own welding tools is probably enough

Thanks again for your technical support
 

a smile

Lifelong hobby - cold iron
Premium Member
Another doubt is that I found that the pictures sent by other friends in the forum are showing slightly reduced pictures, while the pictures I sent are directly displayed. Will this take up more resources and space of the forum? Hope to get a clear reply, so as to timely adjust my sending method, as far as possible not to occupy too much forum resources, thank you!

If there is any inappropriate behavior, please let me know, I will improve, thank you
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Vendor
Another doubt is that I found that the pictures sent by other friends in the forum are showing slightly reduced pictures, while the pictures I sent are directly displayed. Will this take up more resources and space of the forum? Hope to get a clear reply, so as to timely adjust my sending method, as far as possible not to occupy too much forum resources, thank you!

If there is any inappropriate behavior, please let me know, I will improve, thank you

No problem. Post as you have been doing.
 
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