• [Ad-Free Experience]
    Register Today, Craft a Post, and Enjoy an No-Advertising Experience.
    Click Here to Register
  • We are working on a problem where password reset email and likely also new registration email is not arriving and people are having trouble logging in - we're working on it. Sorry about the issues. EDIT -> Josh thinks it's fixed. Contact us on facebook if you are stuck. EDIT-> maybe it's not fixed...hang in there we are working it.

CT 043 issues ..... Repairs - Completed !!

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Moderator
Premium Member
Something that bugs me about these motors is the terminals , knowing almost nothing about AC electric motors , what messes with me is ,the old motor has six terminals & the new one has four.

Again, I'm just a bystander.

If I'm not mistaken, your new motor has three of the 6 wires tied together with shunts as one. That's a total of 4 wires just like your old one......

Edit - don't forget that aftermarket motor manufacturers don't like making a gazillion different motors for every possible replacement application. So motors are often made to run on different voltages etc so the same motor can be used in a few different applications. They typically do this with a connection system like yours has. The shunts are moveable. I believe (but didn't check) that both @dfloen & @TorontoBuilder covered that earlier. You just need to make sure it's both compatible and also configured to operate correctly in your system.
 
Last edited:

Degen

Ultra Member
Premium Member
@Gearhead88

Your motor is likely similar to the one I had on my mill, both times (in about 20years) I had troubles with operation was the terminals on the motor, the last being the connector block burned up for a contactor or two. A supplier (motor rewind shop) I know from my elevator days supplied me with a used old block no charge that fit the machine (odd chinese size) that he happened to have in his shop (BTW this was the final straw that started the switch to VFD and progression to CNC conversion last spring).

I have a functioning 220V single phase 2hp motor that I'm willing to part with for a price (I'm in the GTA, pm me if you are interested, you have first choice, others well....second) as it helps pay for other upgrades. Keep what you need get rid of the rest (right :rolleyes:).

I've only kept it, just to ensure the VFD and new motor was doing what I wanted (its actually performing a lot better than expected considering the motor is a non VFD rated motor, the motor and vfd where both supplied by the same shop which is why I trusted their selection and recommendation, sometimes you pay extra for peace of mind.
 

Gearhead88

Super User
@Gearhead88

Your motor is likely similar to the one I had on my mill, both times (in about 20years) I had troubles with operation was the terminals on the motor, the last being the connector block burned up for a contactor or two. A supplier (motor rewind shop) I know from my elevator days supplied me with a used old block no charge that fit the machine (odd chinese size) that he happened to have in his shop (BTW this was the final straw that started the switch to VFD and progression to CNC conversion last spring).

I have a functioning 220V single phase 2hp motor that I'm willing to part with for a price (I'm in the GTA, pm me if you are interested, you have first choice, others well....second) as it helps pay for other upgrades. Keep what you need get rid of the rest (right :rolleyes:).

I've only kept it, just to ensure the VFD and new motor was doing what I wanted (its actually performing a lot better than expected considering the motor is a non VFD rated motor, the motor and vfd where both supplied by the same shop which is why I trusted their selection and recommendation, sometimes you pay extra for peace of mind.
Thanks for the offer , My mill has been trouble free since I bought it in 2004 , at times , it sits for months without me using it , other times I use it lots . I do use it enough to justify having it , I doubt I will wear it out in my life time . I would like to do the VFD conversion and make it more versatile , down the road when I can . I'm not sure your motor is of any use to me .

I would like to put DRO's on both these machines at some point too , that's on the second or third page of my wish list.

The lathe will run again soon , I think the party in China is winding down , I got an email , to "not worry" they will ship my contactors soon , I only ordered them and paid for them Jan 28 .
 
Last edited:

Gearhead88

Super User
Taking a short break from shop time / engine building .......................

I know some of you have had it with me n' this Lathe BS ......... BUT .......................


I was thinking

My milling machine has a motor starter on it , this one
IMG_1527.JPG IMG_1528.JPG

I'm sensing that some of you would like me to leave all the hooflungpoo electrics intact , and are opposed to the directional switch idea , stay with me here ..........


What if I used the starter above , I can get that on Amazon and then , buy a drum switch at Princess auto , the combination of the two should buy me the thermal overload safety that some of you say I won't have with just the drum switch .

Just askin .................................

Thoughts ???

I want to know if this will work or is it a dumb Idea ? .

Tell the truth , feelings have already been hurt .

I can make this happen and do it quickly too , if it's a reasonable way to get this P.O.S. running again .
 
Last edited:

Darren

Ultra Member
Premium Member
You don't want or need a drum switch. You won't like it after having apron mounted switching either. Fix what's broken with yours.

The drum switch idea is like ripping out a Harley engine and replacing it with a Briggs
 

YYCHM

(Craig)
Premium Member
You don't want or need a drum switch. You won't like it after having apron mounted switching either. Fix what's broken with yours.

The drum switch idea is like ripping out a Harley engine and replacing it with a Briggs

Why all the resistance to a drum switch? My 220V single phase 2HP mill had one before my VFD upgrade. My 120V 1/2HP lathe has one. Simple, mechanical, can't go wrong.
 

Darren

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Mostly it's a safety issue. Plus his has a better system already there. It just needs to be diagnosed.
 

Darren

Ultra Member
Premium Member
A drum switch has no provisions for thermal overload, safety during power failure (could have unintentional start), cannot work with apron control, inconvenient compared to what he has now, and is not as robust.

Why don't the manufacturer's just put in drum switches instead of contactors?

A drum switch would work., yes. But in my opinion it is far better to fix what is there. Besides, it's looking like a bad capacitor. Why are we installing a drum switch to fix a bad cap?
 

Darren

Ultra Member
Premium Member
The switching duty cycle of a contactor is many times higher than a drum switch. Drum switches suffer from contact welding closed, whereas contactors usually fail open. Much safer, obviously.

Also, the off position of a drum switch is not a positive stop. In an emergency this could be a real issue. It would be wise to install a NC E-stop button, rated for the load, in L1 before the drum switch, in a convenient location, but by the time you do that, and incorporate all the other missing safeties, you are into contactor territory....
 
Last edited:

Gearhead88

Super User
Mostly it's a safety issue. Plus his has a better system already there. It just needs to be diagnosed.
It is diagnosed , I knew this weeks ago when I bought capacitors , it's the contactor for forward that is stopping me from having a working machine , KA contactor is sticky too .

The original motor is back in it with new capacitors . It runs beautiful in reverse , forward is dead.

I ordered and paid for three new contactors two weeks ago , they still have not shipped them from china ............ I'm fff'n pissed !! .
 

combustable herbage

Ultra Member
Premium Member
If I was ever a first hand witness to an arc flash incident I would rather it be in an enclosed cabinet where I had some protection from it. rather than holding it in my hand. We are required at work to wear arc flash protection whenever we are doing live troubleshooting on equipment like this so there is a serious amount of energy there.
 
Top