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Still learning new things in fusion 360 regularly...

Janger

(John)
Vendor
Premium Member
There is a fellow offering design services whom I'd ask to model something for me but it would violate US and CDN intellectual property laws. From what I understand I can copy the design for personal non-commercial use but others can't provide commercial services that relate to manufacturing designs covered by IP rights.

To model what I want requires lofting skills that are currently beyond me.

I don't know if anyone else has seen the marine propellers developed Sharrow marine, but they are revolutionary, and me being me, I just want to manufacture some to use on model boats and an electric drive for a kayak.

6cd81d8a6dfc925b3cb5bfb5256d810bc1c5c705.jpeg


a0a2cda129c3dc1e62698e2dbdb9abb84bf876be.jpeg


Now MIT's Lincoln lab has created and patented a similar type of propeller for aviation use, specifically in their case drones. They call them torroid props. There is a huge reduction in noise due to minimises tip vortices. Also greater efficiency by about 20% without any design work to optimize efficiency being done yet.

These new props are a wet dream for those who use micro drones for urban peeping. I think I can model these far simpler props but not the marine ones that I have been looking at the past few years


Toroidal-Prop.jpg

Here is the plant where they are making those interesting tipless props. It's a Titan CNC video. He is a little over the top but you gotta love his enthusiasm. How many $Million to build that place?

 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
They sure are purdy. Guessing not cheap. I wonder what the total manufacturing + finishing time is.
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
When I started learning things, it was through books. Books have a lot of wealth of information but they often miss tips and tricks and short cuts that make life easy, as in right way vs fastest best way. YouTube did one thing very well that books don't, show you that little step/trick/missing info that nots mentioned but it is shown. Additionally, I skim through videos. 15mins in 30secs. If it's interesting then watch the whole thing.

Interesting way to do it. I've been told by others to use fast play and slow down when you want to. But you are taking that to another level. I have no idea how you can skim 15 minutes in 30 seconds.

I find the tips and tricks experience to be quite the opposite. The book has the tips and tricks and content, and the video entertains and promotes. Maybe it depends on the subject matter. Prolly also depends on the author and their real objectives.

I am also getting the sense that youtube is something that you have to invest time in to get anything out of it. I'm simply not willing to do that.

I think it is also a product of our life realities. Something I see often here on the forum. Taking the two of us as examples: (Please don't take offense - I'm just philosophizing about how we are all different. And to be honest, it's a compliment to you and your success.) You have to pay the bills so output volume and cost/benefit are imperatives. I did all that 30 years ago. Now I'm living on past investments and machining for the pure joy of it. It doesn't have to pay the bills and doesn't.

You let your machines print money for you by themselves and watch YouTube in between runs looking for ways to do more, better, cheaper, faster. You seem to be very successful at it.

I live off the money I saved 30 years ago and play with my machines just for the fun of it. In fact, I'm usually too busy having fun to watch YouTube and I don't care about the tradeoff between production volume and tool life.

That's probably not a fair story for either of us, but it's the crude image that is forming in my mind about why I feel so different about my machining vs what others do.

Best of all, it's all ok! There is lots of room for all of us to be whoever we are and still enjoy each other and help each other.
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
They sure are purdy. Guessing not cheap. I wonder what the total manufacturing + finishing time is.

I was interested in getting one till I saw the price. $5000 US each..... Plus you can't even pick it up tomorrow. You have to pay to get on a waiting list.

Last but not least, they are only available for 150hp motors and up. Mine is a 115 that I bought 25 years ago for 6k Canadian. That prop costs more than my motor did. But I bet a new motor like mine is over 10k today. Still......
 
Interesting way to do it. I've been told by others to use fast play and slow down when you want to. But you are taking that to another level. I have no idea how you can skim 15 minutes in 30 seconds.

I find the tips and tricks experience to be quite the opposite. The book has the tips and tricks and content, and the video entertains and promotes. Maybe it depends on the subject matter. Prolly also depends on the author and their real objectives.

I am also getting the sense that youtube is something that you have to invest time in to get anything out of it. I'm simply not willing to do that.

I think it is also a product of our life realities. Something I see often here on the forum. Taking the two of us as examples: (Please don't take offense - I'm just philosophizing about how we are all different. And to be honest, it's a compliment to you and your success.) You have to pay the bills so output volume and cost/benefit are imperatives. I did all that 30 years ago. Now I'm living on past investments and machining for the pure joy of it. It doesn't have to pay the bills and doesn't.

You let your machines print money for you by themselves and watch YouTube in between runs looking for ways to do more, better, cheaper, faster. You seem to be very successful at it.

I live off the money I saved 30 years ago and play with my machines just for the fun of it. In fact, I'm usually too busy having fun to watch YouTube and I don't care about the tradeoff between production volume and tool life.

That's probably not a fair story for either of us, but it's the crude image that is forming in my mind about why I feel so different about my machining vs what others do.

Best of all, it's all ok! There is lots of room for all of us to be whoever we are and still enjoy each other and help each other.
Think of YouTube as the substitute for getting access to a live shop, sometimes good, sometimes bad information.

As to spending time on it not any more. Look for specific info or details and sometimes stumble across neat stuff.

The internet is like a suspect information source, library like with a lot more volumes, the worst part is the misinformation on it that can lead you astray.

I did machining as a hobby and it grew into a business.
 
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