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Rockford CNC Lathe Revival

kevin.decelles

Jack of all trades -- Master of none
Premium Member
I’d probably go with just the gasket glue, very thin. On old machinery you can go to town on gaskets, but with precision fits it can interfere if too thick in my experience,
 

RobinHood

Ultra Member
Is that not a paper gasket still stuck to the HS (blue arrow)? Then you’d only want a thin even layer of the permatex to make it stick (use it more of a gasket ”glue” than a sealing medium).

333C02FA-5CE4-49FE-AAD7-E5C68D0E04F9.jpeg
 

Janger

(John)
Vendor
Premium Member
Last night I put the bearing covers back on with gasket glue. The package said 24 hours to dry. Should I wait longer?
 

RobinHood

Ultra Member
Any conditions associated with the 24h cure time like temp, humidity, etc?

Question: how is the bearing oil retained if you have a “dry” HS? Is there a reservoir of sorts for each of them and individual sight glasses for observation of the level?
 

Janger

(John)
Vendor
Premium Member
Any conditions associated with the 24h cure time like temp, humidity, etc?

Question: how is the bearing oil retained if you have a “dry” HS? Is there a reservoir of sorts for each of them and individual sight glasses for observation of the level?
The reservoir seems to connect to both sides and there is this little hole the oil comes out and up through the bearing cover - that square slot and into the bearing. So the one sight glass covers the whole thing. That empty hole to the right you pointed out earlier Rudy is the drain cock. I guess it does not take much oil at all.

1641348092743.png
 

Janger

(John)
Vendor
Premium Member
Timken bearing lubricant. What should I use? I found this pretty vague statement on the Timken site yesterday. ISO 32 through 220. That site is full of complex detailed information but specific advice is lacking. I have on hand iso 32 and 220. I'm sure any lubricant would suffice but what should I actually use? The timken site also equally vague on what preload should be used. Loads of technical information on various preload measurement techniques.. but how about an actual number like ft lbs?

1641426300410.png
 

RobinHood

Ultra Member
I’d use the ISO 32.

To seat the bearings, I would use a good amount of force (maybe 20-40 ftlbs) while turning the spindle. Back off the nut. Turn the spindle and snug up the nut. Use a pry bar with blocks of wood and an indicator to see if you get any end play (axially) and side play (radially). Adjust the nut to just eliminate play. This will probably leave the bearings a bit loose - that is ok to start with.

Run the lathe and monitor temperature. The bearings should get warm, but not hot. Adjust nut as required to give you the temp you want; about 45*C is what I set my spindle bearings to.

Once you have the bearings running at a steady temp, make some test cuts. If you get chatter (especially while parting), tighten up the pre-load a bit more. At this point you are moving the nut maybe 5* or 10* of arc - basically very little. Monitor and adjust as the bearings are “running in”.
 

kevin.decelles

Jack of all trades -- Master of none
Premium Member
I'd also echo the ISO 32 for the Timken, and if it were plain bearings (babbit) I go with the 220.
 

Janger

(John)
Vendor
Premium Member
Lathe running for an hour. 30C. 2500 rpm. I’m pretty happy with that. Thanks for advice and calls John Rudy Kevin.
 

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Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Cool use of an IR thermometer @Janger .

I almost missed it. The forum superimposed text over your photo. But when I clicked on the photo to have a better look I could see your meter.

Glad you are happy.

And ya, cool bunch of guys too!
 
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