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Sourcing Metal | General Discussion

DavidR8

Scrap maker
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
I don't:confused: Explain it to me now please. I probably don't appreciate what kind of tool you need.
I need a form tool that cuts this shape in the end of a 5/8" rod.
Screen Shot 2021-04-14 at 6.57.05 PM.png
@RobinHood is suggesting that I put a ball nose endmill in a boring bar holder and use it to form the radius on the rod by moving the Z and X axis
 

DavidR8

Scrap maker
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
It's for the floating vise handle.
I need to put the radius on the part with the pin.
Screen Shot 2021-04-14 at 7.12.05 PM.png
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Well it ain't a precise way of doing it but... I have put a nice round end on lots of rod by chucking it in a hand drill and then taking it to the belt sander or grinding stone. It sounds crude but it actually can turn out well.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
I don't have a ton of experience with those large radii tools but I find them fiddly to make & more-so to make cut properly without rubbing. A ball turning tool is really the weapon of choice, but if you just have the occasional part & its not crucial to have perfect geometry, you can just do a series of in-feed cuts, blue it, then round it smooth with abrasive until the blue is gone. That's how I did the nose case for my radial. So you could similarly do custom profiles for which you will never find a cutter. It does help if you have a CAD program to compute the X-Y intercepts, but circular steps can be done with a hand calculator.
 

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Dabbler

ersatz engineer
David I don't think you need a special tool. call me. it is very easy to do on your mill, not your lathe.
 

DavidR8

Scrap maker
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Thanks gents, as always the group comes through with a raft of awesome ideas!
 

Dabbler

ersatz engineer
I was thinking aof a version of rotate-around the pin technique with a normal milling cutter. easy, quick.
 

Alexander

Ultra Member
Administrator
This short piece of brass showed up at my work in a box labeled Fragile handle with care. I had a good laugh. I don't think this could get damaged in shipping. Even Canada post couldn't break this.
IMG_20211004_165627_328.jpg
 

kevin.decelles

Jack of all trades -- Master of none
Premium Member
But Canada post could probably ship that across Canada and back by mistake….. don’t underestimate their true strengths


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Hey guys, I didn't read the whole thread but I have a suggestion for buying "rod" and "bar".

There is a farm supply shop near me where I can get bolts in a plethora of sizes real cheap. I buy bolts (and sometimes nuts) there of various grades (stainless too), chop the heads off, turn off the threads and voila - real cheap bar for my projects.

Gotta be lots of farm supply shops near Calgary. Farm equipment wrecking yards also have plate. It might be a chore to cut out what you need but it's often times available for less than the cost of scrap metal.
 

SparWeb

Active Member
Hello,
I'm still new here, so I will start reading this thread for its long history.
I'm having a TLDR moment with this thread, but I'll get over it because there's probably some gems hiding in here.

Before I dive into reading this whole (long) thread, is there a summary somewhere that I can use?
For work, I need to source materials and processes as well (laser cutting, anodizing, composite bonding, etc) and I 'd like to find out when new players enter or leave the field (in Alberta especially).

Suggestion: Anybody compiling a Google sheet? Does on already exist? Looks like a big enough audience here for that to be very valuable.
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Hello,
I'm still new here, so I will start reading this thread for its long history.
I'm having a TLDR moment with this thread, but I'll get over it because there's probably some gems hiding in here.

Before I dive into reading this whole (long) thread, is there a summary somewhere that I can use?
For work, I need to source materials and processes as well (laser cutting, anodizing, composite bonding, etc) and I 'd like to find out when new players enter or leave the field (in Alberta especially).

Suggestion: Anybody compiling a Google sheet? Does on already exist? Looks like a big enough audience here for that to be very valuable.

Lots of opportunities here and elsewhere in other threads here on the forum for that. Haven't seen anything though.

I earmark threads I want to reference in future by sending myself an email with a link to the thread and a subject that I can search.
 
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