• Scam Alert. Members are reminded to NOT send money to buy anything. Don't buy things remote and have it shipped - go get it yourself, pay in person, and take your equipment with you. Scammers have burned people on this forum. Urgency, secrecy, excuses, selling for friend, newish members, FUD, are RED FLAGS. A video conference call is not adequate assurance. Face to face interactions are required. Please report suspicions to the forum admins. Stay Safe - anyone can get scammed.

Shop Shed build underway

Shop

slow-poke

Ultra Member
We had a sidewalk poured in Ottawa, three years ago. 350 sq ft. Easy access and area was excavated, just needed gravel, forms and cement.

I kid you not, we had two quotes north of $25k. How do you even respond to something like that. I think we need a good old fashioned recession.
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
I quoted the concrete prior to contracting it and it was $2400 for 8 cubic of 25 MPA. The total cost for concrete including shed foundation is $4200.00. There are 6 people on site working now, time about 1.5 hours. Pictures after the commotion leaves.....
I recently read that concrete work in Calgary averaged about $350 cubic yard (maybe m³?).
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
We had a sidewalk poured in Ottawa, three years ago. 350 sq ft. Easy access and area was excavated, just needed gravel, forms and cement.

I kid you not, we had two quotes north of $25k. How do you even respond to something like that. I think we need a good old fashioned recession.
Yes that is my sentiment sometime also. It's criminal what many contractors will gouge with.
 

Dan Dubeau

Ultra Member
Looking forward to seeing the progress. Just started designing my shed the other night. Debating a slab vs framed floor. Thanks for adding some #'s to chew on. Still waiting on a quote from a local company that does short pours.
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Looking forward to seeing the progress. Just started designing my shed the other night. Debating a slab vs framed floor. Thanks for adding some #'s to chew on. Still waiting on a quote from a local company that does short pours.
I'm not sure what you call a shed or what you have in mind but I'll tell you what I did with my plastic/vinyl 8x10 garden sheds.

I made a bottom frame from steel square tubing and then fasten 2x6 boards to them with self drilling screws. They are a solid floor less prone to rotting out then wood on ground, and can be skidded to other locations if need be.
 

Dan Dubeau

Ultra Member
I'm going to build a 8x14, with a 10' lean to off the one side. I'm debating between a slab, or pressure treated frame for the 8x14 part on deck blocks/patio slabs. Leaning more towards pouring a slab, and leaving the lean to in the dirt with a wood block floor on the one side of it for my blacksmith shop. I want to move my welding/fab stuff out there, so I'm leaning more towards slab for obvious reasons. All depends on the cost though. Concrete is pretty much the only trade I don't have a buddy in, and some of the prices for jobs I've heard about have been all over the map leaving me no frame of reference to ballpark the cost. I've helped on a couple small slabs, and am confident In being able to finish it myself (with a friend to help) to my standards, but both were from bags, and I'd rather not go that route again......

There is an existing shed on on the spot right now, but I need to move it first. But before I do that I need to get the tractor running.....Cascading projects.....

Sorry Matt, didn't want to hijack your build thread. Looking forward to the build pics.
 

slow-poke

Ultra Member
Looking good.

The door on our shed was rubbing this spring, after checking with a level it became obvious that the shed was far from level. Not sure who installed the shed but in the low corner they used a 12" length of flexible black perforated plastic drainage tube to support and level that corner.‍

This is actually fairly consistent with other repairs by the previous owner. I have included an image of his tool box.
 

Attachments

  • B8AD719B-65FB-427E-A86E-18CAA56D4EC8.jpeg
    B8AD719B-65FB-427E-A86E-18CAA56D4EC8.jpeg
    68 KB · Views: 1
Last edited:

Matt-Aburg

Ultra Member
Here are some pictures taken by my upper tenant. It is raining today, and the next few days and so won't get my own pictures yet. This area will be used for outdoor woodwork and maybe casting experiments. I will be putting outdoor receptacles also and lighting.
 

Attachments

  • 1.jpg
    1.jpg
    596.5 KB · Views: 21
  • 2.jpg
    2.jpg
    547.1 KB · Views: 21
  • 3.jpg
    3.jpg
    749.1 KB · Views: 21

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
We had a sidewalk poured in Ottawa, three years ago. 350 sq ft. Easy access and area was excavated, just needed gravel, forms and cement.

I kid you not, we had two quotes north of $25k. How do you even respond to something like that. I think we need a good old fashioned recession.

I got a quote to pave my farm lane - $50K. To be fair, the laneway is a half km long. But 50k is not happening.

I wanted to put gravel down. But the bride isn't buying into that. So we had a different outfit do some patching instead. Wife is thrilled. I still feel broke.
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
I got a quote to pave my farm lane - $50K. To be fair, the laneway is a half km long. But 50k is not happening.

I wanted to put gravel down. But the bride isn't buying into that. So we had a different outfit do some patching instead. Wife is thrilled. I still feel broke.
Well maybe the paver thought you wanted to mimic paradise and have streets of gold?
 

historicalarms

Ultra Member
I like the fan finish on the concrete. Don't see that much anymore, it's nice to see some personal touch craftsmanship again.
I actually despise power troweled concrete to mirror finish. pretty much every residential slab for basements & garages are troweled to that degree to appease the eye of the purchaser, but man, 99% of the ambulance calls we made when I was a site supervisor for a land developer in Calgary was to assist some poor builder crewman that slipped on that "slippery when wet" concrete and broke a knee cap or wrist in a slip& fall.
When i had my own slabs poured for house & shop and power troweled, I specified the crew to stop at level & dull finish. Been happy with it ever since.
 

DavidR8

Scrap maker
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
I got a quote to pave my farm lane - $50K. To be fair, the laneway is a half km long. But 50k is not happening.

I wanted to put gravel down. But the bride isn't buying into that. So we had a different outfit do some patching instead. Wife is thrilled. I still feel broke.
50K actually seems ok for 500 m of concrete.
 

historicalarms

Ultra Member
I got a quote to pave my farm lane - $50K. To be fair, the laneway is a half km long. But 50k is not happening.

I wanted to put gravel down. But the bride isn't buying into that. So we had a different outfit do some patching instead. Wife is thrilled. I still feel broke.
A lot of variables go into pricing a paved driveway. The last ones i was involved with were in 02-03 era and mix was pretty much $1000 a 10 ton load at the batch plant , dont know how far you are from closest batch plant but trucking can easily double the price per load. Pretty easy computation to figure out how many loads needed for your drive...Width X length ( 500 M in your case) X depth of mix you want. 4" layed depth will crush/pack down to 3" finish mat. If you already have a previous mat down to use as a base a 3" spread might do the trick but on new mat, I would certainly go with 4".
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
A lot of variables go into pricing a paved driveway. The last ones i was involved with were in 02-03 era and mix was pretty much $1000 a 10 ton load at the batch plant , dont know how far you are from closest batch plant but trucking can easily double the price per load. Pretty easy computation to figure out how many loads needed for your drive...Width X length ( 500 M in your case) X depth of mix you want. 4" layed depth will crush/pack down to 3" finish mat. If you already have a previous mat down to use as a base a 3" spread might do the trick but on new mat, I would certainly go with 4".

It's a paved laneway done by the previous owner. We've been here 10 years. But driving on asphalt with a 20 ton grain Wagon prolly isn't good for it.
 
Top