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First Lathe, any tips on getting it up and running?(picture heavy)

#1
So after many years of wanting a metal lathe I was finally able to get one. An old Logan Model 210 lathe came up on Kijiji that was cheap so I jumped at the chance to get it. What I would love input on is tips on how to best clean and prep the unit and works-pace for use. What sort of things should i be specifically inspecting? What sort of steps should I take first before I attempt working on a piece? Tips on setting up older style tool holder?
 

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PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#2
There are some good Youtube channels I'd recommend for off hour gazing that pertain to lathe/machine restoration. There is a more complete list of favorite Youtubes somewhere on our forum, but these come to mind. There may also be 'groups' dedicated to your specific model & that can be very valuable networking knowledge & maybe even parts. Yahoo Groups still exists although they are slowly giving way to more general hobby machinist forums.
- Keith Rucker vintagaemachinery.org
- Basement shop guy
- Keith Fenner turn wright machine works
 

Johnwa

Active Member
#4
Is that the one that was on for $250? With all the accessories you got that would have been an incredibly buy.
At a minimum I would go through all the bearings and oiling points. It’s amazing how much sludge can accumulate over time. Disassembly of the headstock and apron are good ideas.

I’d get a better toolpost. There’s enough flex in these sized lathes already.

John
 
#5
Is that the one that was on for $250? With all the accessories you got that would have been an incredibly buy.
At a minimum I would go through all the bearings and oiling points. It’s amazing how much sludge can accumulate over time. Disassembly of the headstock and apron are good ideas.

I’d get a better toolpost. There’s enough flex in these sized lathes already.

John
Yep this is the one for $250 ! i couldn't believe it. thanks John I'll be sure to look at those points. on bearings do people normally upgrade these older models with new bearings or is that only if they are really bad?
 

Dabbler

Well-Known Member
#7
If you shop around you can find inexpensive 4 way and Aloris AXA tool holders. I've done a ton of work with a SB9a using Anderson/Rocker tool posts and you can do great work with the one you have, at least to start.

Use you lathe for a while before worrying about your bearings... Chances are they are fine. If not, you can only know by using the lathe anyway.
 

RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#8
I would de-grease / clean everything really well. While you do that, get rid of any rust. Then inspect all the parts prior to reassembly and make a list of items that need attention right away and things that can be improved / replaced at a later time (using your lathe perhaps to make the part). Sometimes you need to put things together with a faulty part to make a new one - that’s ok.
 
#10
I would de-grease / clean everything really well. While you do that, get rid of any rust. Then inspect all the parts prior to reassembly and make a list of items that need attention right away and things that can be improved / replaced at a later time (using your lathe perhaps to make the part). Sometimes you need to put things together with a faulty part to make a new one - that’s ok.
Perfect based on Peter's suggestions above I looked closer at the apron today and discovered a broken "transfer gear" not sure what you call the gear that engages power feed on the cross slide. So I'll have to figure out why that broke and if I can replace it.
 

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RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#12
So I'll have to figure out why that broke and if I can replace it.
Check for shear pins in your drive train. Folks are notorious for replacing the designed “weak link” (aka shear pin) with materials that will not shear under excessive load. They use steel instead of brass or aluminum for example. So in case of a mishap, the “weak link” now becomes some other part - like your broken feed gear perhaps.
I have seen this in the 4 lathes I worked on thus far. Lucky for me, no other parts “took the fall” for the shear pins; there could easily have been major damage done...

Great job by the way cleaning and “getting into the meat of things”! That’s an excellent way to learn your new machine and it helps you understand how things work and what the capabilities/limitations are.
 
#13
Check for shear pins in your drive train. Folks are notorious for replacing the designed “weak link” (aka shear pin) with materials that will not shear under excessive load. They use steel instead of brass or aluminum for example. So in case of a mishap, the “weak link” now becomes some other part - like your broken feed gear perhaps.
I have seen this in the 4 lathes I worked on thus far. Lucky for me, no other parts “took the fall” for the shear pins; there could easily have been major damage done...

Great job by the way cleaning and “getting into the meat of things”! That’s an excellent way to learn your new machine and it helps you understand how things work and what the capabilities/limitations are.
Ok great tip on shear pins I was not aware that was a thing. I did notice a brass key on the lead screw (I think) side of the broken gear, part of it may have been bent I'll start there. Great forum guys thanks for the help.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#18
Maybe someone can confirm but I think this is how you figure it out
- determine your pin taper either by PN or measuring big end diameter D. Example #2 = 3/16" so D = 0.193".
careful measuring because if the head was beat down & distorted it may give you false micrometer reading
- measure taper pin length, example L = 1.25"
- diameter reduction Dr = L * .02083 = 1.25 * .02083 = .0260"
- small end diameter d = D - Dr = 0.193 - .0260 = 0.167"
- so offset or infeed depth of cut on the small end is half of Dr if you prefer, DOC = Dr/2 = .0260 / 2 = .013"
** metric taper pins use a different taper factor ***

So the way I made mine was
- turn the stock down to major diameter (0.193" in this example)
- mark out the length (1.25" in this example)
- turn the small diameter down (0.167" in this example) to outboard shoulder which is pin length
- blued the stock & used a file to connect the 2 diameters ensuring taper was straight (teeny straightedge & flashlight)
- part it off & finish the ends

This is kind of crude. You could set up a compound taper angle, My hole/shaft was already mangled by the factory driving a steel roll pin in there. My taper pin fit but I'm pretty sure so would a 0.193" straight pin LOL
 

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RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#19
Your procedure looks good.

I have used the compound angle method in the past. I have learned to make the angle too steep initially as I can go back and decrease it if required for better fit. I leave extra length just in case. The toolpost grinder is a great tool to just take off a little bit if required.
 

Johnwa

Active Member
#20
I did make a couple using my little unimat lathe. I wasn’t sure regular brass rod was an appropriate material or not. It was a slow process on the Uni because I couldn’t support the end, it took many many teensy cuts.