• Scam Alert. Members are reminded to NOT send money to buy anything. Don't buy things remote and have it shipped - go get it yourself, pay in person, and take your equipment with you. Scammers have burned people on this forum. Urgency, secrecy, excuses, selling for friend, newish members, FUD, are RED FLAGS. A video conference call is not adequate assurance. Face to face interactions are required. Please report suspicions to the forum admins. Stay Safe - anyone can get scammed.

Product Aircraft hardware

Product

Brian26

Active Member
Those strange bolts reminded me of the structural bolts/nuts used to put up steel buildings these days. The tool used turns the bolt into the nut, which is held by a hex-shaped recess in the tool. Once the bolt reaches its required torque, it snaps off and you are done! The hex opening in the picture of the bolts might be used for a similar purpose - especially if spaces are tight - which I think is often true in the aircraft-making industry.
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Those strange bolts reminded me of the structural bolts/nuts used to put up steel buildings these days. The tool used turns the bolt into the nut, which is held by a hex-shaped recess in the tool. Once the bolt reaches its required torque, it snaps off and you are done! The hex opening in the picture of the bolts might be used for a similar purpose - especially if spaces are tight - which I think is often true in the aircraft-making industry.

Had a broken filling replaced the other day. The tooth sheared and would not support a new filling. (I don't know why not). The dentist used two titanium shear pins installed as you describe - crank em in till they break off. I don't like to be frozen so I could hear and feel them snapping. The new filling is still there..... Knock on wood!
 

trevj

Ultra Member
Those strange bolts reminded me of the structural bolts/nuts used to put up steel buildings these days. The tool used turns the bolt into the nut, which is held by a hex-shaped recess in the tool. Once the bolt reaches its required torque, it snaps off and you are done! The hex opening in the picture of the bolts might be used for a similar purpose - especially if spaces are tight - which I think is often true in the aircraft-making industry.
Used to play with those for a living. The hex is for holding the fastener from rotating, while drawing it in to the hole with the break-off nut. One of the problems is that the fasteners come in several oversizes, and you really need the correct reamer for each size. Plus you need the nuts, if you wanted to use them as intended.

As much as I'd like to have about a gallon jar of those screws just because, mainly I see them as a pretty good bit of agregate for the next concrete foundation pour that comes along.

At one point, my workplace did a purge and threw out all the bin stock we had that was not in it's original packaging. we had a dumpster full of about every kind of hydraulic hose and line fittings you could think of, I filled a gallon bucket with helicoils and other thread repair inserts, screening them through half inch mesh, to only get the smaller sizes... other shops were required to dump out tons of hardware... It was a waste!

But you gotta sort it, or pick through it every time you need something, and you only have so much time on the planet!
 

Chicken lights

Forum Pony Express Driver
Used to play with those for a living. The hex is for holding the fastener from rotating, while drawing it in to the hole with the break-off nut. One of the problems is that the fasteners come in several oversizes, and you really need the correct reamer for each size. Plus you need the nuts, if you wanted to use them as intended.

As much as I'd like to have about a gallon jar of those screws just because, mainly I see them as a pretty good bit of agregate for the next concrete foundation pour that comes along.

At one point, my workplace did a purge and threw out all the bin stock we had that was not in it's original packaging. we had a dumpster full of about every kind of hydraulic hose and line fittings you could think of, I filled a gallon bucket with helicoils and other thread repair inserts, screening them through half inch mesh, to only get the smaller sizes... other shops were required to dump out tons of hardware... It was a waste!

But you gotta sort it, or pick through it every time you need something, and you only have so much time on the planet!
The geriatric shop assistant has pails of stainless hardware and brass fittings and other random bolts. Nothings labelled. Drives me up the wall dumping one out to sort through it to find 2 bolts or fittings. The stainless hardware was scavenged from a shop 20 years ago, when it closed

To each their own, I prefer walking to the bolt bin or stainless box and grabbing what I need, when I need it

Although you NEVER have the right size brass fitting, which is a whole 'nother rant
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
....... sometimes you do, even labeled the container that held them....... Be damned if I can figure where their safe place is.......:mad: Once I do, I promise, I will put the new ones I bought away....:rolleyes:
Hey I do that sort of thing too! I seem to leave things where ever I last left my mind. I eventually find them both though (even if just temporarily).
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
Hey I do that sort of thing too! I seem to leave things where ever I last left my mind. I eventually find them both though (even if just temporarily).

Just ask google where they are.......

Mostly kidding but I accidentally discovered that it works really well for my phone!
 

StevSmar

(Steven)
Premium Member
I have a rule that any non-square drive wood screws automatically go into recycling (That is, I drop them off when I’ve got enough stuff to justify the trip).
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Administrator
Moderator
Premium Member
I have a rule that any non-square drive wood screws automatically go into recycling (That is, I drop them off when I’ve got enough stuff to justify the trip).

You do know that they have Allen and Torx head wood screws now...... They are hard to find but I would not be bringing them to the drop off depot......
 

Upnorth

Well-Known Member
I have quite a bit of aircraft hardware in my collection. It's leftovers or stuff that got separated from it's certification so it can't be used on aircraft. Whenever I design anything I use hardware from the planes. It's of a known quality and easy to obtain if I ever need replacement hardware. There are a couple of issues though. I have loads of countersunk screws that are of the exact same size. Far more than I will ever need. I did have to purchase some 100 degree countersinks for the CNC mill because that is the aircraft standard.

As far as sorting it I usually don't mind doing that. Takes a while but saves time later. I do have to admit last time I was sorting I just got tired of it. I just had enough and tossed what was left into a container and gave it to a friend who makes experimental aircraft.

One friend of mine used aircraft Hi-loks to repair the transom on a jet boat. It used to crack and need repairs every year or two because of the stress. It has not cracked since the repair using Hi-Loks.
 

Brian H

Super User
You do know that they have Allen and Torx head wood screws now...... They are hard to find but I would not be bringing them to the drop off depot......
The common brand is GRK screws. We mainly use them for structural (decks and reinforcing floor structures) fasteners and they are incredibly impressive.
 

trevj

Ultra Member
The common brand is GRK screws. We mainly use them for structural (decks and reinforcing floor structures) fasteners and they are incredibly impressive.
Yep. They are actually structurally "rated", meaning they, unlike most of the other screws out there, are considered up to replacing nails as a structural component!

Have used a bunch of them, mostly for installing bracing on building components being moved. Pretty expensive, but pretty damned good at what they do!
 

Aliva

Super User
I was helping a friend build some decking at his cottage last year. First time I ever saw GRK screws. As said, very impressive and easy to install because of the Torx head . I checked pricing at Home Depot and I was equally surprised at the high cost. I'll just stick to Robertson deck screws for now.
 

trevj

Ultra Member
I was helping a friend build some decking at his cottage last year. First time I ever saw GRK screws. As said, very impressive and easy to install because of the Torx head . I checked pricing at Home Depot and I was equally surprised at the high cost. I'll just stick to Robertson deck screws for now.
Yeah, they are expensive, butif you want or need the strength, there is not much out there that will come close, without resorting to steel plates and through bolts.
 
Top