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Other Safeties Use them or Not?

I don't know, I wish these had better guards instead of the 1980's special only half of the shaft bs

Not having guards is ok IF your working on the item, but if your working around them on something else when your attention is not 100% on the spinny shaft of death behind you that randomly turns on by itself it can be quite dangerous

View attachment 29610View attachment 29611
I don't think of those as "safeties" but as "guards" as they are generally non-removable unless they are being serviced.

But I agree a definite must have.
 

Susquatch

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I believe those are mechanical, look almost identical to BB's

They might be. But my multimeter doesn't validate that. There is no continuity on any of the inputs to the outputs when on is pressed.

Furthermore, absolutely nothing clicks or makes contact when the on switch or off switch is pressed.

The switch assembly is also quite heavy. It feels like there is a big relay in there.

An internal circuit diagram is not provided.

I have not tried a load of any kind yet, but will before I wire them into anything.

It's also possible it's defective.
 

Tecnico

(Dave)
Premium Member
They might be. But my multimeter doesn't validate that. There is no continuity on any of the inputs to the outputs when on is pressed.

Furthermore, absolutely nothing clicks or makes contact when the on switch or off switch is pressed.

The switch assembly is also quite heavy. It feels like there is a big relay in there.

An internal circuit diagram is not provided.

I have not tried a load of any kind yet, but will before I wire them into anything.

It's also possible it's defective.

@Susquatch, your measurements make sense but you need the rated voltage applied to make the relay activate.

There are at least 3 variations that look like that switch. The simple mechanical on/off version (from BB) which I have on my table saw, a magnetic version with four connection tabs and a third version, magnetic, with a fifth tab which appears can be used to wire in a remote E-STOP switch. That circuit branch maintains power to the coils of the relay.

See the 4 pin version here: 4 Pin Version including circuit diagram

See the 5 pin version here: 5 Pin Version, the circuit diagram on the switch looks like this: Photo of 6 Pin Switch, the circuit diagram looks like this: KJD17 Switch Diagram.

Which one do you have?

I'm looking for places to mount the 5 pin version plus an E-STOP on my First mill.

D:cool:
 
They might be. But my multimeter doesn't validate that. There is no continuity on any of the inputs to the outputs when on is pressed.

Furthermore, absolutely nothing clicks or makes contact when the on switch or off switch is pressed.

The switch assembly is also quite heavy. It feels like there is a big relay in there.

An internal circuit diagram is not provided.

I have not tried a load of any kind yet, but will before I wire them into anything.

It's also possible it's defective.
Can you send a pic of back and side.
 

Susquatch

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Which one do you have?

None of the above. All of the ones above only include external wiring. I wanna know what is inside.

The only one remotely similar is the last one because it has a big housing. The first ones all have a small housing.

Yes, I know it has to powered. I hooked it up to 110 on the inputs with zero results.

I'll do it again. I might see if I can attach a load too.

In the meantime, here are more photos. As you can see it's a big e-stop. It's heavy too. I wanna know the INTERNAL circuits.

20230120_132342.jpg 20230120_132317~2.jpg 20230120_132408~2.jpg
 

Susquatch

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Here is the external wiring for it. On the surface it appears to be a simple paddle switch that either shuts off both hot and neutral for 110 or two legs of 3 phase 220. The fact that it cuts both hot and neutral for 110 is another sign that it is more than a simple switch.

20230120_134213.jpg

I tried connecting it to a live 110 circuit again just now. Doesn't do anything. Nothing on either output. No continuity between any of the contacts.
 

Susquatch

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Mystery solved.

I pulled the other switch out of the package. Acts the same way unconnected to power. But if you add 110 to the inputs, you hear a relay close when on is pushed and 110 is passed to the output.

It's just a simple contactor for an estop on the mains.

I've had it long enough that there is no hope of refund. Truth is I don't even remember where I got it.

Anyway, thanks to everyone who tried to help.
 

Tecnico

(Dave)
Premium Member
OK, isn't that interesting, not the answer I was expecting, either one of them!

At least you now know how it's supposed to work.

D:cool:
 

Garyt

Active Member
Yes, I have considered that possibility. I don't truthfully know exactly what's there yet. Either way, I plan to do a major re-wire when I find and install the 3phase motor and vfd. The details of how the switches are wired will fall out and get handled during that process. My thoughts are to use an internal relay controlled by the two switches. Ya, I know that's not really a parallel wired system, but the result is. The reason for that is that I want to run resistive braking too since my lathe has no foot brake. Lots and lots to figure out when that project hits the drawing board. First I need to find an affordable 2.5 or 3Hp vfd rated motor.

And ya, parting is not my favorite task either. Unlike many on here, I love threading though!
Especially blind hole internal threads.
 

Susquatch

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@Susquatch make a brake for the lathe, use a bicycle brake system (Amazon), add a foot peddle and simple stop interrupt switch when you step on the foot peddle.

Yes, I had imagined something like that. Maybe a bit more robust than a bike brake though. I also imagined it connected to the VFD Brake System.

It all has to wait till I find an appropriate VFD Rated 2.5 or 3hp motor though. It's near the top of my spring summer ToDo list. But if it turns out like so many other of my projects it might not happen for another year. No worries though, i have an awesome lathe as is.
 

Susquatch

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What about a hydraulic disc brake setup for a go kart?

I was thinking more like a 3ft wide foot plate on a pivot like other lathe foot brakes. I don't want to have to look for the pedal when I'm in panic mode.

But if I know you, you are not done with me yet! ;)
 

phaxtris

(Ryan)
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I was thinking more like a 3ft wide foot plate on a pivot like other lathe foot brakes. I don't want to have to look for the pedal when I'm in panic mode.

But if I know you, you are not done with me yet! ;)

Haha, we are on the same page with the foot brake size! I was thinking the pedal actuates the master cylinder of the hydraulic brake, you would just have to figure out how much throw the m/s needs and have an appropriate length lever on the other side of the pivot, probabaly need some springs to counter act the weight of the pedal, but I don't think it would be to difficult to impliment
 

Susquatch

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Haha, we are on the same page with the foot brake size! I was thinking the pedal actuates the master cylinder of the hydraulic brake, you would just have to figure out how much throw the m/s needs and have an appropriate length lever on the other side of the pivot, probabaly need some springs to counter act the weight of the pedal, but I don't think it would be to difficult to impliment

I agree. I'll prolly fiddle with this before I get to the motor so it's ready to go when I am.
 

phaxtris

(Ryan)
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On that topic, what is the deal with vfd's and brakes ? I thought I read you need a special type of VFD, or maybe an external resistor for the VFD to handle the sudden stop of the brake. Is that correct ?
 
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