Copying lathe parts for my new friend in Alabama

dfloen

Active Member
#1
When I bought my Emco V13 from Govdeals in Ohio in early March, there were 3 of them for sale. Two were in good shape, one was taken apart, parts missing etc. I got a good one. Through a post on Facebook i met a guy in Alabama who was bidding on the parts machine after the first buyer refused to take it and it was relisted. I saw the machine when i was in Ohio the previous week and it didn't look bad but I didn't look closely. I wish they'd have told me that the sale fell through because i would have bought it too. I offered my opinion on it to the fellow from Alabama and he bought it. Most parts were available and he ordered them, but several parts couldn't be sourced new or used. Nobody parts them out it seems. So i agreed to help my new friend out. He's missing the change gear quadrant, RH bearing block, tailstock leadscrew, dial holder and a few other bits, and probably more to come.

Here's some pics. Everyone likes pics, right?



He's missing this block



this quadrant



Tailstock screw

I started with the quadrant. Simple job for the bandsaw and mill



I had some welding to do



The welding didn't warp it too bad. Took 25 thou off each side


Wish i would have made the bandsaw cuts a bit straighter, but i left a bit of extra meat to clean up
 

dfloen

Active Member
#4


there's a bearing block inside that big chunk of steel. Somewhere



I used a sandwich of my block, some parallels, and the new block, along with the dro to get all the measurements transferred over. Not a lot of room for error here


An adjustable parallel as a backup measurment




Bores are done,



Whittled out some bushings



And pressed em in.

 

dfloen

Active Member
#5


With the bushings in and bored to sized, i was able to pin the two blocks together to transfer the rest of the holes. The DRO is a lifesaver here, saving constant tool changes from drilling and boring.



And it fits. I had to trim a bit off the top to adjust the slope of the leadscrew to 0.0

And if anyone notices, the counterbores are larger than original because the new thrust bearings are larger in Dia then the originals.
 

dfloen

Active Member
#7

This is the third attempt at the tailstock leadscrew. The second attempt would have worked fine, but i wasnt ok with it. I had a hard time with it. Gummy steel and my setup wasnt optimal. By the third attempt i had the setup dialed in and it came out bang on.



nut for the quadrant





this part was easy, it holds the graduated dial for the tailstock
 

dfloen

Active Member
#12
That is the original SB vise as far as i am aware. I had it opened right up because my boring bar was so long and it was a quick job. Took light cuts...real light

I rarely use my shaper anymore, but i really enjoy it when I do. Its a fine machine.
 

David_R8

Scrapper of metal
Premium Member
#15
How long did it take you to make those parts? Which look fantastic by the way.
Very generous of you to do that work!
 

dfloen

Active Member
#16
Thank you. It was maybe 3 or 4 days in the shop total. The 5/8 LH acme threads were honestly the hardest part. I used the surface grinder to accurately grind the tool, and i just couldnt get a decent cut. I tried different material and that was it. It cut very nice after. I'm not a machinist but have cut plenty of threads, and my SM 1660 has to be the nicest setup for threading with the leadscrew reverser, but these threads kicked my ass the first few times.

Thanks for the compliments. The guy was stuck, he would have had to part out an otherwise nice machine. I cant wait to see my parts on it and have it make some chips.
 

Everett

Well-Known Member
#17
Those are awesome, and very cool you could do fitup checks on your machine to verify before shipping. Cool of you to help the fellow out, I agree it's a shame to tear apart and part out or scrap something that could be fixed and put back into service.
 

Tom O

Ultra Member
#18
Thank you. It was maybe 3 or 4 days in the shop total. The 5/8 LH acme threads were honestly the hardest part. I used the surface grinder to accurately grind the tool, and i just couldnt get a decent cut. I tried different material and that was it. It cut very nice after. I'm not a machinist but have cut plenty of threads, and my SM 1660 has to be the nicest setup for threading with the leadscrew reverser, but these threads kicked my ass the first few times.

Thanks for the compliments. The guy was stuck, he would have had to part out an otherwise nice machine. I cant wait to see my parts on it and have it make some chips.
nice work! Did you plunge straight into it or did you have it at 14.5 degrees?
 

dfloen

Active Member
#19
I was at 14.5, but the first time I had the compound swung the wrong way, the way for rh threads. Brain fart. I realized pretty quickly what was up, swung it the proper way, picked up the thread and made a few more cuts. It was better, but but the material was so tough and gummy that it got ugly. Scrapped that one and tried again, and it was better, and would have worked but it just wasnt up to snuff. I completed it and installed it in my lathe, and it worked, but i decided to try again, and if i could make it better, great, if not i had one done already that he could use. The third try turned out great. One phenomenon with ACME threads, is that the diameter will grow on you. It will displace some material rather than cut it. I started at .625 and it grew to .640ish.