• Guest, Help us understand what we can do better in future. Click Here!

Too powerful for home shop? Lincoln Invertect 350 PRO

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#1
Here is the setup: I am building now for 3 or 4 weeks a 50 ton shop press. I have a 200DX Everlast welder which I used to weld some 1/2" and 3/8" steel as well as even 1". This welder will go to 160 amps max on stick and since I have almost unlimited amount of stick electrodes I use these a lot with a TIG centred machine. The 160 is what the machine *indicates* - I think it may be actually less - Invertec at 160 runs same rods (5/32 6010) with far less sticking.

I wanted to learn MIG (I know its supposedly easy but still) and also wanted more then 160 amps for stick. I looked for dedicated stick machine and Everlast 300 AMP machine looks great for my needs but new its over 1000 CAD + I still don't have a good MIG.

So I went and got a used Invertec 350 PRO - it can be run on single phase and has whopping 425 amps max output (!!!). I still need to get a wire feeder for it to use as a MIG.

It can also do air arc gouging process as a bonus.

I currently have 50 amp outlets for power in the under 300 amp range (with 50% or so for the start - so if breaker doesn't trip on start its fine) for the welder and can push it to 60 amps for just over 350 amp output. Hard wired on 80 amp breaker should get me to full output 240V single phase (again as long as breaker doesn't trip at start). Data given in the manual is for the max inrush current not operating current + its for 230V. Supposedly a breaker can handle 50% overload for up to a minute (not sure is it slow blow one or regular) thus enough to start.

Now I know I can weld multiple passes with my old welder set to MAX for thicker stuff and supposedly people welded 1" with just 150 amps (1/8 7018 rod) - so did I made a mistake and should sell it and get for the same money say Miller 252 (used) - already set for MIG? I do know Invertec 350 has excellent opinion - I am just trying to optimise my money spent - there is always more to get to the shop and never an excess of $$$ to spend. Note I still need used wire feeder for MIG.

General opinion of how big you need to go with stick is 225-300 & I assume MIG as well.

I run a lot of 6010 rod. Some 7018. I also have exotic rods such as 318 but have not run them. Also have high strength stuff such as 10018.
 
Last edited:

Tom O

Active Member
#2
I’ve got the Miller 351 the 1 means single phase and never had any problems power wise I don’t have any mig attachments for it but have a Miller 135 with stitch. The good thing about the 351 is no-one will pack it off on you.
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#3
Is your miller with or without PFC (power factor capacitors) and on what breaker is it? I am just curious - these transformer type machines are using more power overall and a lot of "wasted" but not billable power when they idle with PFC.

My other option was to get an old transformer based welder like the 250 amp dailarc ones (either blue or red) plus a small Mig welder like some 180 - cheaper overall but seem less capable as well.
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Premium Member
#4
Here is the setup: I am building now for 3 or 4 weeks a 50 ton shop press. I have a 200DX Everlast welder which I used to weld some 1/2" and 3/8" steel as well as even 1". This welder will go to 160 amps max on stick and since I have almost unlimited amount of stick electrodes I use these a lot with a TIG centred machine. The 160 is what the machine *indicates* - I think it may be actually less - Invertec at 160 runs same rods (5/32 6010) with far less sticking.

I wanted to learn MIG (I know its supposedly easy but still) and also wanted more then 160 amps for stick. I looked for dedicated stick machine and Everlast 300 AMP machine looks great for my needs but new its over 1000 CAD + I still don't have a good MIG.

So I went and got a used Invertec 350 PRO - it can be run on single phase and has whopping 425 amps max output (!!!). I still need to get a wire feeder for it to use as a MIG.

It can also do air arc gouging process as a bonus.

I currently have 50 amp outlets for power in the under 300 amp range (with 50% or so for the start - so if breaker doesn't trip on start its fine) for the welder and can push it to 60 amps for just over 350 amp output. Hard wired on 80 amp breaker should get me to full output 240V single phase (again as long as breaker doesn't trip at start). Data given in the manual is for the max inrush current not operating current + its for 230V. Supposedly a breaker can handle 50% overload for up to a minute (not sure is it slow blow one or regular) thus enough to start.

Now I know I can weld multiple passes with my old welder set to MAX for thicker stuff and supposedly people welded 1" with just 150 amps (1/8 7018 rod) - so did I made a mistake and should sell it and get for the same money say Miller 252 (used) - already set for MIG? I do know Invertec 350 has excellent opinion - I am just trying to optimise my money spent - there is always more to get to the shop and never an excess of $$$ to spend. Note I still need used wire feeder for MIG.

General opinion of how big you need to go with stick is 225-300 & I assume MIG as well.

I run a lot of 6010 rod. Some 7018. I also have exotic rods such as 318 but have not run them. Also have high strength stuff such as 10018.
Tom I have a Everlast mig/stick combo that does 275Amp. Seems like loads to me but if you want to try it with your material you’re welcome to come by. PM me if interested.
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#5
Well I would be fine with that Everlast but switching models is expensive... I just welded 250amps full sticks on new to me 350 pro from 50amp plug and it was totally fine as expected.

I now have to hunt for wire feeder which I hope I can get cheap.

So far I never seen a MP - multi process machine that would be a capable TIG machine - all MP machines I saw have the TIG same as regular stick machine - i.e. touch start, no HF, rarely pulse etc.

This is why there seems to be no easy way to go around having two machines. Oh well, I now look at it that as long as both machines don't break down my welding needs are satisfied for next 10 - 20 years or more.
 

kevin.decelles

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
#6
I run two machines. I went with a Longevity Weldall 250pi (back in 2010). This machine came with 200amp stick (ac/dc), 250amp TIG (HF start, pulse etc.) and 50 amp plasma cutter. Knock on wood, it has been flawless. My TIG welding is embarrassing, but... put that on the operator!

For MIG I went with Millermatic 211 MVS (multi-voltage switch) w/auto-set. Very simple 220V mig, no pulse, no bells/whistles. Great machine.

I sold my Lincoln 225 AC "tombstone" when I got the Longevity machine, some days I regret it..... It was a transformer based machine, heavy to move around, but it sure worked well. I may have an opportunity to buy it back from the guy I sold it too.... I'll probably do that.
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Premium Member
#7
The Multi process machines seem to keep getting better and better. This latest one from everlast is 250A and has all the TIG/MIG/Stick features you would want. HF Start, AC/DC, pulse, Mig wire feed stitch/timer etc. It's just missing a plasma cutter. Next generation?

https://www.everlastwelders.ca/products/multi-process-mig-tig-stick/power-mts-252sti.php

$3k CAD though...

Tom I think your best option for a wire feeder is an auction but possibly gov surplus.
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#8
The Multi process machines seem to keep getting better and better. This latest one from everlast is 250A and has all the TIG/MIG/Stick features you would want. HF Start, AC/DC, pulse, Mig wire feed stitch/timer etc. It's just missing a plasma cutter. Next generation?

https://www.everlastwelders.ca/products/multi-process-mig-tig-stick/power-mts-252sti.php

$3k CAD though...

Tom I think your best option for a wire feeder is an auction but possibly gov surplus.
Wow, didn't know that the new machine can actually do everything now one would ever need - they must have came out with it in the last few months or less. The price for that class machine looks very cheap - I know its not a Lincoln or Miller but just 3k for all of that is cheap. The Tig part in 250 amp range with AC for ALU is around $2000 - it is hard to get a separate fully functional MIG in 250 amp range for just $1000 - heck old as in 15 years plus no longer produced Miller 251 sells used for around $1000 on auction. Had I known one of these existed I would have went for it - sold mine for at least $1000 and for just $2000 more got a brand new machine on 5 year warranty.

Oh well. At least I can do air arc gouging... not like its a common process especially at home.

I look at used wire feeders at auctions - buying new or gently used is out of price range.
 
#9
1. There are a few multi-process welder options (MIG/TIG/STICK) on the market. As was noted previously the everlast 252STi is the only one that meets your specs in terms of max amperage. However I have listed some of other MP welders I am aware of that seem to meet the requirements for most hobbyist or lighter/portable shop use... Everlast PowerMTS 221STi , Miller MultiMatic 220 AC/DC, ESAB Rebel EMP 205ic.

2. In terms of what welder(s) you need... I suppose you have to look at what you spend most of your time on and if you are doing it for a hobby or production. You can rent welders for those one off projects, or farm out the welding to a fab shop. Particularly if there is a particular specification - CWB for structural welding as an example, that you may not have. I think your post header indicates how you might be leaning. As your cost to jump from 1/8", 7018 rod and 160 amps to 3/16" rod and 200+ amps is fairly substantial to tackle 1/2" material. However you do not get some of the nice features in terms of CC arc strength adjustments for stick and of course no CV MIG capability.
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#10
Lincoln invertec 350 is a MP machine - so it is indeed MIG / TIG / STICK - but not as all inclusive package as Everlast 252STi - which must have just appeared on the market.

Oh well, I guess I deal with the hand I have right now - I just don't think its now worthwhile to sell two welders I have and get the Everlast 252STi which would be about same money +- few hundred max.

Everlast PowerMTS 221STi is also nice - its same like my current model but adds MIG - through for a $1000 premium its a bit pricey as far as what you get - you can get a nice MIG welder in 200 amp range for $1000.

As for Miller - https://www.millerwelds.com/equipme...ltimatic-220-ac-dc-multiprocess-welder-m30190 I know it says "NEW" next to it - again I think I missed whole new generation of welders that just came out. I just checked and it was announced at the end of last year - so few months ago. The price is acceptable as well - not too bad in fact at just $3900 for a miller...https://www.kmstools.com/miller-multimatic-220-welder-155089 maybe it can be had for touch less.

Now I have even more buyer remorse - I should have checked for new tech that was coming out - oh well. At least I see a lot of new tech is also in the 200amp+ range so as per my original post it doesn't seem my welder is too powerful for a home shop - the home shop is simply catching up to industrial power machines very, very fast.
 
#11
Hey you have two great welders, so an enviable position from my point of view. Hey and if you should want to part ways with the everlast, I might be interested. Have fun on your press build
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#12
Hey you have two great welders, so an enviable position from my point of view. Hey and if you should want to part ways with the everlast, I might be interested. Have fun on your press build
Yes I have two welders! Now I have the whole new need for a wire feeder - so many choices - its like a whole new welding world out there. You can have briefcase models, from Lincoln or Miller. You can have bench models. 2 rollers or 4!

Briefcase models are tested for durability - check out videos from both Miller and Lincoln where 12SV and LN-25 respectively are dragged by truck and driven on to show durability.
 

Tom O

Active Member
#13
I may be a little paranoid but whenever I buy expensive things for the shop I think about how easy it will be for Johnny lightfingers to pack it out!
Let’s face it the locks they put on garage doors are garbage!
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#14
For most of my machines they would need a crane - but they could steal tooling and say the inverter welders.

Its a big (huge) fear of mine. Cross fingers will not happen. Please no.