Question about modelling and 3D printing a part

calgaryguy

Chris
Premium Member
Noob to 3d printing here. I dont own a printer (yet), but I'm curious how hard it is to take an existing part and model/3d print it.

EG (red swingline for scale):

IMG_2509.JPG IMG_2510.JPG

The original part is stamped/bent from 1/8 mild steel.
 
Last edited:

calgaryguy

Chris
Premium Member
Im also interested in hearing how stiff/durable parts made from 3d printing can be? I know there is a wide range of filements that can be used, and have heard of 'carbon fiber' filament recently.

The part in question is a bracket that bolts under the cast table of a wood Tablesaw and holds a 'splitter'. Eg:

height-adjustment-lever-scaled.jpg


The orange level and stainless 'splitter' it holds are attached to the 'part' I illustrate in my first post above.
 
Last edited:

phaxtris

(Ryan)
I'm pretty new at the modeling side of it but if you are decent with computers a program like fusion 360 only takes a few evenings to learn how to whip up a model for something simple like that

Just start with something really simple in fusion, a box with a hole in it or something, work your way up from there....plenty of you tube videos to learn from

Having the printer will make it more enjoyable...taking that 3d model from the computer and turning it into something tangible
 

David_R8

Scrapper of metal
Premium Member
Im also interested in hearing how stiff/durable parts made from 3d printing can be? I know there is a wide range of filements that can be used, and have heard of 'carbon fiber' filament recently.

The part in question is a bracket that bolts under the cast table of a wood Tablesaw and holds a 'splitter'. Eg:

height-adjustment-lever-scaled.jpg


The orange level and stainless 'splitter' it holds are attached to the 'part' I illustrate in my first post above.
That's a Sharkguard isn't it?
What make and model saw?
 

David_R8

Scrapper of metal
Premium Member
On the design question, part of the difficulty question depends on how faithful you need to reproduction to be. If you need it to be a replica, that is more involved than getting the basic shape right with the holes the right size in the right places.

SketchUp is pretty easy to use and if I recall correctly you can export to 3D print.
 

gerritv

Gerrit
Fusion360 has a Canvas import feature. Put your part on a scanner, take a jpg image of it. Or take some digital photos perpendicular to the face you need to model. Import a jpg into Fusion as a Canvas, then use the Calibrate function to calibrate the photo to an actual dimension.
There are videos on YT that show this in action.
I recently drew this up (with some sizingg mods) from a few photos and 3D printed it (5 separate parts). It is a dual VBlock for my Nippon Kogaku 6 shadowgraph (aka Nikon) to hold parts on the stage. I had found a Mitutoyo one, for US$600+, which was never going to happen.

1655894711465.png
 

Attachments

  • 172-378-4.jpg
    172-378-4.jpg
    118.5 KB · Views: 7
  • IMG_20220610_094451.jpg
    IMG_20220610_094451.jpg
    213.8 KB · Views: 7

calgaryguy

Chris
Premium Member
That's a Sharkguard isn't it?
What make and model saw?
My pics are of a sharkguard bracket for a Unisaw, yes. My second post above was a generic sharkguard photo that is not related to the bracket in my first post. I added the generic sharkguard photo to allow people to visualize what the bracket might be for.
 

gerritv

Gerrit
My pics are of a sharkguard bracket for a Unisaw, yes. My second post above was a generic sharkguard photo that is not related to the bracket in my first post. I added the generic sharkguard photo to allow people to visualize what the bracket might be for.
To answer part B of your original question, I don't think I would trust a 3D printed part for this. It will work for a while, until it doesn't. And that would be during a cut of course.

I think a bit of .125" steel, cut/bandsawed/ground to appropriate shape would be best. For the aligning bent part, perhaps silver solder or weld a bit on? If you make it oversize (the part with slots), bend, then trim it would likely be fairly quick process.

gerrit
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Fusion360 has a Canvas import feature. Put your part on a scanner, take a jpg image of it. Or take some digital photos perpendicular to the face you need to model. Import a jpg into Fusion as a Canvas, then use the Calibrate function to calibrate the photo to an actual dimension.

OMG Gerrit. That is a hidden gem of a feature......

I am just coming up for air from my tax and farm duties. I have a little time now.

I'm gunna do a deeper dive into Fusion and see what I can do with this.....

Question - will it do more views to create 3D parts or do you have to "extrude" them?

Another Question - what 3D printer do you recommend (with what options)?

And yet another question LOL! Can I install the hobby version of Fusion on more than one computer?

OK, sorry. No more questions. This round anyway......
 

gerritv

Gerrit
You can put canvas' on each of the 3 planes, and even on top of surfaces. You still have to create the sketeces in order to extrude, the canvas is just there to help you get the shapes.

I have an Ender 3 Pro, highly affordable, and out of the box very useful. Over time you will want to upgrade to stronger bed springs (to retain plate level longer) and a Pi to run OctoPi to help manage printing queues remotely. I also now have a MicroSwiss hotend and direct drive. Lastly I am about to replace the guide wheels with harder material. Outside of that there is not much really needed. Ppl will tell you to go Auto bed level but frankly with the stronger springs I only re-level once every few weeks.

Fusion360 personal/hobby can be installed on as many machines as you want, but you can only use one at a time. It will offer to log you out of any other place wehre you are signed in.

I use PrusaSlicer for slicing, Cura is a disgraceful GUI (IMVHO) and Simplify3D hasn't been updated in forever.

Gerrit
 
Last edited:

gmihovics

Garrett
Premium Member
Ppl will tell you to go Auto bed level but frankly with the stronger springs I only re-level once every few weeks.
I am totally one of those people. it's really about peace of mind, I don't have to worry that the 14 hour print I'm going to start is going to have adhesion issues 4 hours in. In the end l, it's all up to personal preference though.

everyone should have a printer. the ender 3 line is a great starter line for any beginner.
 
Top