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Parts washer- new to me

#2
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It was missing a screen/sponge/filter in between those two parts. So, home hardware had an air filter for $5, I cut a piece to fit it.

Next is to bend up some steel for the legs to get this on casters so it’s moveable easily
 
#5
Ia
Varsol.

Napa has a “safety solvent” with a lower flash point but it’s almost $50 more per 5 gallon pail. I figure with the lid on it that closes it should be safe to use varsol
I've noticed that many parts washer pumps indicate that they can only be used in water based cleaners and not solvents. I use varsol in mine and did eventually replace the pump but I'm sure I got 10 years out of the first one.
 
#7
Probably should be, but no I'm not, and don't take any precautions. I don't let my young son hang around when I'm using it but other than that nothing else. Heredity diseases are likely to kill me off before the problems of my hazardous work and play habits do.
 
#8
You guys at all worried about vapour toxicity?
I’m not sure what that is, to be honest

I know I’m somewhat skeptical that having bare hands in solvents is healthy, but it’s not every day for ten hours a day either. I try to wear gloves when I can, but I never thought about what it might do to lungs

Again, it’s not all day every day, so I don’t think much of it

Should I?
 
#9
Well if a guy figures he might live to old age (what ever that is) it is always wise to take safety precautions, cuz they sure the hell won't hurt you. I personally get lazy and do believe the risk is very low for myself.
 
#10
I’m not sure what that is, to be honest

I know I’m somewhat skeptical that having bare hands in solvents is healthy, but it’s not every day for ten hours a day either. I try to wear gloves when I can, but I never thought about what it might do to lungs

Again, it’s not all day every day, so I don’t think much of it

Should I?
I deal with a lot of different industrial chemicals at work and I'd be very cautious with these kind of things. It's not just an issue of using them daily all day, many things build up in your body and cause horrible things later in life (in the same way hearing loss does) or turn into cancers. A lot of the chemicals I've seen over the years don't have an immediate impact but overexposure once will make you hyper sensitive to them for the rest of your life, and some will burn your lungs so bad that you won't breathe correctly going forward. There's no shame in taking precautions with there kind of things.
Anything with benzine is not to be trifeled with, and even somewhat mundane chemicals like acetone can have serious consequences (acetone eats the fat out of your skin).
Personally I think people often believe that because they can't see it, it's unlikely to be an issue but you can't see electricity either and we all know what can happen there. Buy a respirator and make sure you do your research. It's never going to be worth it.
 
#11
I deal with a lot of different industrial chemicals at work and I'd be very cautious with these kind of things. It's not just an issue of using them daily all day, many things build up in your body and cause horrible things later in life (in the same way hearing loss does) or turn into cancers. A lot of the chemicals I've seen over the years don't have an immediate impact but overexposure once will make you hyper sensitive to them for the rest of your life, and some will burn your lungs so bad that you won't breathe correctly going forward. There's no shame in taking precautions with there kind of things.
Anything with benzine is not to be trifeled with, and even somewhat mundane chemicals like acetone can have serious consequences (acetone eats the fat out of your skin).
Personally I think people often believe that because they can't see it, it's unlikely to be an issue but you can't see electricity either and we all know what can happen there. Buy a respirator and make sure you do your research. It's never going to be worth it.
I’ve heard, as an example, that gasoline will flush itself from your body but diesel fuel will build up over your lifetime.

There’s a reason most old mechanics hands are gnarled and swollen. I do see more and more young techs using nitrile or rubber gloves when they’re wrenching.

I forgot to look at the MSDS sheet or label on the parts solvent when I was at the shop. You guys have me curious if it’s as benign as I think it is, or whether some caution should be heeded.
 
#12
I deal with a lot of different industrial chemicals at work and I'd be very cautious with these kind of things. It's not just an issue of using them daily all day, many things build up in your body and cause horrible things later in life (in the same way hearing loss does) or turn into cancers. A lot of the chemicals I've seen over the years don't have an immediate impact but overexposure once will make you hyper sensitive to them for the rest of your life, and some will burn your lungs so bad that you won't breathe correctly going forward. There's no shame in taking precautions with there kind of things.
Anything with benzine is not to be trifeled with, and even somewhat mundane chemicals like acetone can have serious consequences (acetone eats the fat out of your skin).
Personally I think people often believe that because they can't see it, it's unlikely to be an issue but you can't see electricity either and we all know what can happen there. Buy a respirator and make sure you do your research. It's never going to be worth it.
I’ve heard, as an example, that gasoline will flush itself from your body but diesel fuel will build up over your lifetime.

There’s a reason most old mechanics hands are gnarled and swollen. I do see more and more young techs using nitrile or rubber gloves when they’re wrenching.

I forgot to look at the MSDS sheet or label on the parts solvent when I was at the shop. You guys have me curious if it’s as benign as I think it is, or whether some caution should be heeded.
 

Janger

(John)
Administrator
Premium Member
#13
There are some solvent alternatives - might be worth investigating. I think not getting it on your skin and not breathing the fumes is a simple precaution. Plastic gloves and a air mask. Not a dust mask.
 

CalgaryPT

Super User
Vendor
Premium Member
#14
It was missing a screen/sponge/filter in between those two parts. So, home hardware had an air filter for $5, I cut a piece to fit it.
Next is to bend up some steel for the legs to get this on casters so it’s moveable easily
A great cheap solution for washer filters I find is 3M ScotchBrite pads. Cheap and effective. Waterproof too: https://www.homedepot.ca/product/scotch-brite-heavy-duty-scrub-sponge-3-pack-/1000830848

I wrap them around a dowel with zip ties for parts brushes as well.

If you are using Varsol, PA used to sell a replacement fuse-able link for units like this for 3 bucks. If your unit is anything like mine when I rebuilt it after 15 years, the link was rusted past its lifespan. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/8022392-fusible-link-assembly/A-p8003622e

Congrats on your purchase.
 
#15
There are some solvent alternatives - might be worth investigating. I think not getting it on your skin and not breathing the fumes is a simple precaution. Plastic gloves and a air mask. Not a dust mask.
Speaking of fumes- a few of you guys have various fans and vent setups. I’ve been kicking around the idea of adding a fan that vents to the outside, and some type of cold air return setup. It might not hurt to setup this wash tank near such a vent.

How do you go about sizing a fan and vent for a shop?
 
#16
A great cheap solution for washer filters I find is 3M ScotchBrite pads. Cheap and effective. Waterproof too: https://www.homedepot.ca/product/scotch-brite-heavy-duty-scrub-sponge-3-pack-/1000830848

I wrap them around a dowel with zip ties for parts brushes as well.

If you are using Varsol, PA used to sell a replacement fuse-able link for units like this for 3 bucks. If your unit is anything like mine when I rebuilt it after 15 years, the link was rusted past its lifespan. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/8022392-fusible-link-assembly/A-p8003622e

Congrats on your purchase.
Thanks!
I’ll have to look into that fusible link, hopefully I don’t have to rebuild this any time soon.

A scotchbrite pad was my first thought to use, I don’t think it’s that critical, I’m guessing it’s just there to keep any large chunks from the pump?

I’ve always wondered why there are never an inline filter on parts washers. It wouldn’t be THAT hard to install a rubber hose and a filter. But there must be a reason they aren’t more widely used?
 

CalgaryPT

Super User
Vendor
Premium Member
#17
Thanks!
I’ll have to look into that fusible link, hopefully I don’t have to rebuild this any time soon.

I’m guessing it’s just there to keep any large chunks from the pump?

I’ve always wondered why there are never an inline filter on parts washers. It wouldn’t be THAT hard to install a rubber hose and a filter. But there must be a reason they aren’t more widely used?
Yup. No rocket science here...it's just as you suspect. When I restored my old PA washer the pump had to be replaced. The new one did have a filter on it, but pretty coarse. The larger models like yours often have a secondary filter that is finer. They are effective at catching paint chips, not just from the things you are cleaning but from the washer itself as it ages and flakes.

I wish when I had restored mine I had put a drain cock in the bottom. But I'll do that next time around.
 
#18
Yup. No rocket science here...it's just as you suspect. When I restored my old PA washer the pump had to be replaced. The new one did have a filter on it, but pretty coarse. The larger models like yours often have a secondary filter that is finer. They are effective at catching paint chips, not just from the things you are cleaning but from the washer itself as it ages and flakes.

I wish when I had restored mine I had put a drain cock in the bottom. But I'll do that next time around.
Mine has a drain plug, not a drain cock. Now you’ve got me thinking that might be a good idea to add, BEFORE I add solvent to it. It’s still empty until I figure out some casters.

Well, I did put in 5 gallons to test it Saturday but I drained what was in there again so I could move it easier.

You’re right, mine has been sitting empty for awhile, once I had solvent in it and got things moving around I used a 4” scraper to lift all the assorted loose paint/mud/rust off the bottom and sides. Probably close to a coffee cans worth.