Multifix tool post WTB

Dabbler

Ultra Member
#1
For a long time now I've been looking for a Multifix tool post and some holders for a 14" or 15" lathe. If someone is converting to the Aloris style, then maybe we can do a deal.
 
#2
Do folks convert Multifix style to Aloris style? I have Aloris style on my 15" and Multifix style on my 11" - preference for the Multifix (very rarely need to swing the compound).
 

Tom Kitta

Ultra Member
#3
Do folks convert Multifix style to Aloris style? I have Aloris style on my 15" and Multifix style on my 11" - preference for the Multifix (very rarely need to swing the compound).
Usually Multifix is seen as superior to Aloris but also is more expensive - you can get Chinese multifix holders but they are more expensive then aloris style.

Thus the only avenue of converting would be for some people to have more then one and want to sell one or they want to go with cheaper Aloris.

I recently sold some multifix holders but I had no tool post for them.
 

Hacker

Active Member
#4
My lathe has the Multifix and I would like to get my hands on another four or five of them but I have haven't had much luck finding used ones locally.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#5
I swear - somebody, somewhere has a basement full of Bison rotary tables, Multifix toolposts... and all the missing lathe tailstocks LOL.
 
#7
I paid $450CAD in 2014 for the "E" size multifix style (6 conventional tool holders and 1 extra height holder). I believe the "E" size is a bit larger than BXA, but smaller than CXA. Looking at the Aloris style - perhaps a bit cheaper (?), seems at least competitive. I have since purchased additional holders, HD boring bar holders, MT sleeves - there is a reasonable selection of special holders available.

I have never used a real Multifix (or Aloris for that matter) - those would be out of my price range. Regardless my experience with the knock offs of both these styles has been favorable.
 

Hacker

Active Member
#8
There are several companies in China making them, the one that I have heard that is pretty good is Create. I have seen several in auctions but they always go for 125 and over so I figure that one of these days I will bite the bullet and put an order in with them. I have the B size and they are way more then that now. They are listed on EBay for four holders 280 and 170 shipping CDN. Who are you buying from?
 
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David_R8

Scrapper of metal
Premium Member
#9
I thought about getting a Multifix but the holder cost and my inability to make one in a home shop put the brakes on that.
 

Hacker

Active Member
#10
They are sure nice to use. I have thought about making them but up until recently did not have the machine capable of doing it. Maybe next winter. LOL There is a fellow on YouTube that has made them he goes by Cam at Battler here is a link to the video.
I follow him as he does some interesting projects and is very knowledgeable and is a machinist by trade.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#15
The increased adjust ability looks desirable for sure. Have you heard of any comments that the toolpost body itself is more stable than the regular piston or wedge block?
I cant seem to find the link I save a while back, but I got the impression there 2 classes of these Multifix clones. Kind of like Vertex quality (good = close copy of euro tool) vs less good copy of a copy I'm kind of in deep with my standard Chinese piston so I guess I'd have to have a real compelling reason to change. Back when I bought my lathe these were crazy expensive. Maybe they were the euro ones at the time.
 
#16
It would be hard to compare which post is more stable - the Aloris or Multifix style. Setting up a comparison of the same size post on the same machine in the same heavy cut would be an interesting academic experiment. Regardless, they are both good. I have two lathes, one fitted with Aloris style (PhaseII) and the other Multifix style (copy) - but they are different size posts/machines.

I think you will find that how the post is mounted is a more significant factor. I found my PhaseII would rotate on interrupted cuts - I made a thin washer nearly the size of the post (~2.25" dia) with a thicker outer rim. That put the clamping load further out and solved the tendency to rotate. Of course if one were to make plinth to replace the compound, the post would be very stable.

Both posts (and numerous other QCTP styles) are very good, to get the benefit the installation details are important.
 

Dabbler

Ultra Member
#17
It is my understanding that the most solid to least solid progression is: Aloris Wedge + 4 way, Dixon, Multifix, Aloris piston and finally American Rocker. Of course there are many Hobby toolposts, some of which will be quite solid.

My interest in getting one is purely aceademic. I want to prove the rigidity of each. "Trust but verify"!!
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#18
Renzetti, Gotteswinter & others claim they get much improved stability with solid toolpost. Which is kind of a misnomer because often the toolpost itself is the exact same. They have tossed the compound slide & mounted a beefy solid inter-block. And the toolpost is then also mechanically keyed. If I go that route I would prefer to be still be able to remount my compound so kind of reluctant to make it permanent to the extent that using the compound again is a pita to reinstall. Compounds have a purpose. But the Multifix might offer a unique advantage in this scenario. Seems like they are sturdy, relatively wide base & still offers more positional tool freedom vs rectangular blocks. Heavy hogging isn't my thing but anything that offers better dimensionalcontrol, finish, reduced vibration etc. is of interest.

I've also been told that people who switch to VFD drive see improved finish all things equal, not so much because they can get tune rpms, but the vfd drive is less coggy (I think that's an electrical term) than a regular single phase motor. Any of you vfd-ers concur?

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Dabbler

Ultra Member
#19
I didn't notice any difference VFD'ing my mill WRT surface finish. I'm sure it would make more of a difference on a lathe in any event.

I do plan to experiment next winter with solid tool post mounts and I'll report back here if I do. I know from one of Renzxetti's videos that he hasn't used his compound in years.
 

RobinHood

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#20
They have tossed the compound slide & mounted a beefy solid inter-block. And the toolpost is then also mechanically keyed.
I think if one were to always lock the compound gib tight, a similar rigidity increase could be achieved as with an inter-block. It is just not very convenient, or even impossible if there is no gib lock.