Fixture plate for CNC Router

Degen

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Hmmm, why would you ever need or want to machine into a riser plate? Just curious.
Again while you may do a lot of machining you get caught inside the box. I come out with a finished part and a clean edge.

And it makes good money doing it. Soooo....Think outside the box.
 

TMToronto

New Member
I am enjoying the work you are showing. I have a much smaller hobby CNC - Onefinity Woodworker X50 - that I have customized and added on to. I added an ATC spindle and am also using a Masso G3 with the linear tool rack pick and place logic - it is working out well so far. I purchased a slightly smaller (and thinner) cast plate from ASA to use as a base. They were close and very easy to work with. I remember being somewhat awestruck backing into their warehouse with my jeep and being surrounded by story high racks, some with aluminum bar 12 - 16" diameter and 10 - 20' long. I am not a business, just a homeowner who builds things, and I always appreciate when I find a business, especially as large as ASA, that does not treat me any differently than a larger customer. Well, except for the prices I imagine :)

Is your custom Cancam based off their B1 or B2 series machine? How would you describe the experience of discussing/adding the customizations, and how long did those conversations take as well as the shipping?

I would very much like to see future updates when your time permits, as well as the machine milling plastics and aluminum once you have it and your fixtures dialed in and working.

Tom
 
I am enjoying the work you are showing. I have a much smaller hobby CNC - Onefinity Woodworker X50 - that I have customized and added on to. I added an ATC spindle and am also using a Masso G3 with the linear tool rack pick and place logic - it is working out well so far. I purchased a slightly smaller (and thinner) cast plate from ASA to use as a base. They were close and very easy to work with. I remember being somewhat awestruck backing into their warehouse with my jeep and being surrounded by story high racks, some with aluminum bar 12 - 16" diameter and 10 - 20' long. I am not a business, just a homeowner who builds things, and I always appreciate when I find a business, especially as large as ASA, that does not treat me any differently than a larger customer. Well, except for the prices I imagine :)

Is your custom Cancam based off their B1 or B2 series machine? How would you describe the experience of discussing/adding the customizations, and how long did those conversations take as well as the shipping?

I would very much like to see future updates when your time permits, as well as the machine milling plastics and aluminum once you have it and your fixtures dialed in and working.

Tom
This is a C1-OTAT. I upgraded from the 2.2 kw motor to 5.5 kw. The one shown is the video below is their standard that is mainly sold to schools. My spindle takes ISO-30 toolholders rather than the smaller ones. I also had the Gantry increased to 12 inches from 8 inches. Their standard dust boot in numatic. It is not removable, and so not good for aluminum. I did not opt for the dust boot or the vacuum. The machine is still wired to receive a vacuum system if so, chose later. Also putting their dust boot on would make less Z travel. I insisted on having the spindle bottom just below the LED lights.

Wait time was extreme due to many uncontrolled events. Covid, Shipping Backlog, Rail washout, many orders in front of mine, when they finally received the frame. Total time from order to delivery was about 9 months.

I have been to ASA in Mississauga one time. It was enormous. For convenience's sake, I deal with Essex Metals down here.

See below video for Base model C1-OTAT

 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
When do you think your mods & tweaking will be to the stage you hang out the shingle for CNC milling work?

You mentioned thread milling on the tooling plate (and then finish threaded by hand). Is that because of tolerance limitation of the cnc/software or why couldn't do it entirely on the CNC?
 
When do you think your mods & tweaking will be to the stage you hang out the shingle for CNC milling work?

You mentioned thread milling on the tooling plate (and then finish threaded by hand). Is that because of tolerance limitation of the cnc/software or why couldn't do it entirely on the CNC?
I just finished getting a small job done on the lathe. Tomorrow, I need to go pick it back up at Heat Treat and polish it. Then I need to go deliver to the customer and see another sales call.

On the plate:
I still need to finish bolting it through the PVC, hopefully tomorrow or next day. (All drilled just got sidetracked) Then I have C-bores and engraving. I am very close to running some parts to test. (2 weeks)

I chose not to finish the thread milling on machine because I was not 100 percent confident. I had never done thread milling before, but now I am addicted! Future project will be to tune in the process. I did not use a cycle but drew a helix in Mastercam and created my own cycle.

So close..
 

TMToronto

New Member
This is a C1-OTAT. I upgraded from the 2.2 kw motor to 5.5 kw. The one shown is the video below is their standard that is mainly sold to schools. My spindle takes ISO-30 toolholders rather than the smaller ones. I also had the Gantry increased to 12 inches from 8 inches. Their standard dust boot in numatic. It is not removable, and so not good for aluminum. I did not opt for the dust boot or the vacuum. The machine is still wired to receive a vacuum system if so, chose later. Also putting their dust boot on would make less Z travel. I insisted on having the spindle bottom just below the LED lights.

Wait time was extreme due to many uncontrolled events. Covid, Shipping Backlog, Rail washout, many orders in front of mine, when they finally received the frame. Total time from order to delivery was about 9 months.

I have been to ASA in Mississauga one time. It was enormous. For convenience's sake, I deal with Essex Metals down here.

See below video for Base model C1-OTAT

Thank you for sharing that. I had been to Cancam's website before but never seen that model (C1) - I still do not see it on their site except for some videos. It looks like a nice machine - nice balance of size and functionality, and a very clean design. I believe the Taiwanese motion hardware used has a good reputation vs other overseas sources/manufacturers. I believe I read that this was one thing people liked about this company, that it was cost effective given where it was made, but also had a NA presence for quality support and after sales service that can be relied upon. Does it ship assembled, or is just the frame made overseas and the USA or Canada based facilities put all the components together and take care of final assembly?

The electrical cabinet looks well organized and neatly put together. I noticed 3 servo drives in the video. Does this CNC have the X axis gantry connected below the table, and a single servo/ball screw provides the Y axis motion?

As an aside, I was looking at your website and it looks like you do some great work. I sent a message through the contact form with some feedback.

Tom
 

TMToronto

New Member
I just finished getting a small job done on the lathe. Tomorrow, I need to go pick it back up at Heat Treat and polish it. Then I need to go deliver to the customer and see another sales call.

On the plate:
I still need to finish bolting it through the PVC, hopefully tomorrow or next day. (All drilled just got sidetracked) Then I have C-bores and engraving. I am very close to running some parts to test. (2 weeks)

I chose not to finish the thread milling on machine because I was not 100 percent confident. I had never done thread milling before, but now I am addicted! Future project will be to tune in the process. I did not use a cycle but drew a helix in Mastercam and created my own cycle.

So close..
I am new to CNC machining, and have only recently completed my ATC/Masso build. I am slowly learning the CAM side of things (I am teaching myself to use F360), and starting slowly with milling as I get to know my machine and tool paths. I started with machinable wax, then moved on to acrylic and HDPE, and am now starting work with aluminum.

I purchased a thread mill from Scientific Cutting Tools, and like you am excited to try thread milling. I have a 2.2Kw ISO20 spindle, so will be using a single form vs tri or multi given the torque limitations. I have not yet broken any tooling, but that delicate thread mill certainly looks like it may become my first casualty:).

I am learning that all the feeds and speeds tables and calculators will never be as effective as time spent getting to know your own particular machine. My first real project will be a vacuum plate made from cast aluminum, but I still have a few days of experimentation before I start that.
 
Thank you for sharing that. I had been to Cancam's website before but never seen that model (C1) - I still do not see it on their site except for some videos. It looks like a nice machine - nice balance of size and functionality, and a very clean design. I believe the Taiwanese motion hardware used has a good reputation vs other overseas sources/manufacturers. I believe I read that this was one thing people liked about this company, that it was cost effective given where it was made, but also had a NA presence for quality support and after sales service that can be relied upon. Does it ship assembled, or is just the frame made overseas and the USA or Canada based facilities put all the components together and take care of final assembly?

The electrical cabinet looks well organized and neatly put together. I noticed 3 servo drives in the video. Does this CNC have the X axis gantry connected below the table, and a single servo/ball screw provides the Y axis motion?

As an aside, I was looking at your website and it looks like you do some great work. I sent a message through the contact form with some feedback.

Tom
The gantry is tied in below the table and is controlled by one 25 mm ball screw as you said. Their website is dated and does not reflect their current products. Their main product now are the "C" series routers. They are also in early stages of building a VMC.

On my own website, I have a lot of updates to do too. I am just so busy building this shop. When it is closer, I will be replacing the stock images of my machines with my own and adding the Router.
 

TMToronto

New Member
The gantry is tied in below the table and is controlled by one 25 mm ball screw as you said. Their website is dated and does not reflect their current products. Their main product now are the "C" series routers. They are also in early stages of building a VMC.

On my own website, I have a lot of updates to do too. I am just so busy building this shop. When it is closer, I will be replacing the stock images of my machines with my own and adding the Router.
Thank you for the information on their website - I will check in from time to time to see if they update it. Again, it looks to be a very capable CNC, and given its construction I imagine it can hold fine tolerances well.

Being too busy to update one's website is a good thing :)
 
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