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Custom Sword Blade

AraK-noiD

Member
Quite a few years ago I took a dead hard drive apart just to see what was inside. As I said in a previous post there are two very strong magnets in each one. I just stuck one to the blade and the attraction was strong. The blade may not magnetize but it has the correct properties to be attracted to magnets.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Sorry, above my pay grade, but I think what is being discussed is a magnetic chuck like what is typically used on a surface grinder. I'm really not sure how they test for magnetic clamping force of semi or reduced magnetic strength alloys other than to throw the lever & see how well it sticks, maybe with side strip steel backing bars.

Link https://www.moldmakingtechnology.com/articles/use-magnetic-chucks-to-reduce-your-cost-of-operation
suggests that 416 stainless (which is one of the more magnetic stainless steels) is about half the attractive strength of typical steel, but they go on to say that's about same as cast iron which I've seen held. It might be a function of mass & surface contact area. Maybe your alloy is similar to 416 if a magnet sticks. Another complication might be the blade overextending the mag vise footprint unsupported, so maybe requiring a cradling jig. Grinder shops are even a bit more specialized.

My gut feel is this project is in the domain of bladesmith type folks. I've seen pics & vids where they are using belt/wheel sanders, the same equipment as knifemaking & working to similar tolerances. Your project would be similar with requirements of a blunter edge plus the surface detailing you mention, but no heat treating.
https://www.jayfisher.com/knifemaking_history.htm

 

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PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Back to CNC milling, this picture came up on another forum I frequent & does a better job of explaining a 'mostly complete' 2-sided 3D profile milling job. These are very accurate micro propeller blades so very complex constantly changing foil geometry. They mill the profile from slab stock flip & do the same on the other side. The excess stock is what is giving support. The trick is milling through selectively leaving small webs which are then cut leaving relatively simple hand work finishing. But I suspect using even conservative $/hr shop rate, programming etc. this wouldn't come cheap.
 

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PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Stumbled on this vid & it shows some of what I think might be comparable attributes to your project. Notice extensive use of typical blademaker belt grinder & his own jigs to assist with the blade angle. Some curvy swords don't lend themselves jigs, its 95% freehand/eye process (hence the skill and $$). If you are not heat treating that would save some expense and risked warpage.

 
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