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Bought a TIG

Downwindtracker2

Well-Known Member
No ,kidding about programming. That is the main compliant about my Magnum (Hugong)Wave 200 . The front face looks like an ESAB. To use stick, you have to program it.
 

DavidR8

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@Downwindtracker2
This is a screen cap of the control layout from the Primeweld manual.
It makes complete sense to arrange the controls according to where they pertain to the process. Pre-flow at the far left and post at the far right.
Screen Shot 2020-05-13 at 3.17.10 PM.png
 

JohnnyTK

Active Member
My other choice was an AHP 201 or an Everlast 185DV @ $1350 delivered. AHP won't ship to Canada so that crossed them off the list.

I contacted Primeweld and they got back to me within an hour, they ship to Canada via UPS. I hate UPS cross border charges so they gave me 10% off. The list price at the time (mid-April) was $775 USD. About a week after that they raised the price to $799 but notified me that I would still get the $775 - 10% deal when stock arrived on May 11.
They gave me my own discount code and the actual discount ended up being 103.87 USD or 13%. So my total ended up at $790.87 USD or $1114 CDN to my door.
Comes with a CK 17 torch :)
Does that price include duties and taxes? Sweet looking machine being near Everlast is one of the draws for me, so now I'm sitting on the fence again.
 

DavidR8

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We
Does that price include duties and taxes? Sweet looking machine being near Everlast is one of the draws for me, so now I'm sitting on the fence again.
I don't think so. I expect to pay GST and perhaps PST.
I would have paid GST from Everlast so the difference will be BC PST of 7%
 

CalgaryPT

Ultra Member
Vendor
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Just a heads up about pulse David. As useful as it is, it makes lots of people sick—as in nauseous. For some (me included) the pulsing can be disorienting at certain frequencies. You'll have to play around with it. Some people have no issue; for others the frequency is around 2-3 PPS that seems the worst. So if you are testing pulse out and you feel kinda weird, change the frequency and it should disappear. Some aren't bothered by it.

I find since I built my devoted TIG table I can sit at, it's not as bad. But it still makes me feel a little odd.
 

Downwindtracker2

Well-Known Member
From the looks of it you can set the stick. Once I learned how to set the arc on mine, it's really sweet. In fact I use mine mostly with 3/32 7014 ., I have a lot. I would think the 225, means amps . On mine, it derates the stick function, still it's 180 DC, enough to burn 1/8 7018. At that, you can glue some pretty serious steel.

Here's a look at what Shanghai Electric does (ESAB),https://www.esab.pl/ca/en/products/...ent-cc/industrial-equipment/et-186i-ac-dc.cfm my Hugong looks the same. They should, they were made in the same city. They more less use one knob . Your is much more intuitive .
 

DavidR8

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Just a heads up about pulse David. As useful as it is, it makes lots of people sick—as in nauseous. For some (me included) the pulsing can be disorienting at certain frequencies. You'll have to play around with it. Some people have no issue; for others the frequency is around 2-3 PPS that seems the worst. So if you are testing pulse out and you feel kinda weird, change the frequency and it should disappear. Some aren't bothered by it.

I find since I built my devoted TIG table I can sit at, it's not as bad. But it still makes me feel a little odd.

It’s interesting that you mention the pulse making you feel odd. I have epilepsy but through testing I know that strobe lights are not a trigger for me. But I certainly do think about it when I watch videos of pulse TIG.


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DavidR8

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From the looks of it you can set the stick. Once I learned how to set the arc on mine, it's really sweet. In fact I use mine mostly with 3/32 7014 ., I have a lot. I would think the 225, means amps . On mine, it derates the stick function, still it's 180 DC, enough to burn 1/8 7018. At that, you can glue some pretty serious steel.

Here's a look at what Shanghai Electric does (ESAB),https://www.esab.pl/ca/en/products/...ent-cc/industrial-equipment/et-186i-ac-dc.cfm my Hugong looks the same. They should, they were made in the same city. They more less use one knob . Your is much more intuitive .

I’ve never run any stick either so I am looking forward to having that capability.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Downwindtracker2

Well-Known Member
One of the things I like about stick, it doesn't take gas, either mix for the MIG or argon for the TIG. Weldors will likely explain my mistakes, chuckle, but from an old millwright here is what I chose
For basic steel I have been buying 3/16" stock, stands, electric motor mounts etc. strong enough and easy welding
I've picked up 3/32" welding rod, it's an easy size to work with, easy on the welder, too. At work I would use 1/8" or even 5/32" 7018 almost exclusively, at work, 1/4" was light stock
3/32 7018 this is the rod to use if you are making suspension parts for lift kits or building a trailer. It strong, but much more important it's vibration resistant.
3/32" 7014 it's about the same as 6013, it just takes more juice. At work we called 6013 tin bashers rod, it was made for sheet metal work. I used it to repair guards. It's an very easy rod to use, easy striking, can look good too. For your first stick, pick up some to practice with. The frustration with it, the slag will cover the weld making it look like you have done a better job than you did.
3/32" 6011, easiest to strike, nasty to use, it's deep pentitrating(sp). this is the rod to use through rust and paint. It takes a different technique , whip and pause

On my machine the welder plugs were a bit of an odd ball, I modified Miller ones, the stringer and welding clamp I picked up at PA on sale.
 

DavidR8

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One of the things I like about stick, it doesn't take gas, either mix for the MIG or argon for the TIG. Weldors will likely explain my mistakes, chuckle, but from an old millwright here is what I chose
For basic steel I have been buying 3/16" stock, stands, electric motor mounts etc. strong enough and easy welding
I've picked up 3/32" welding rod, it's an easy size to work with, easy on the welder, too. At work I would use 1/8" or even 5/32" 7018 almost exclusively, at work, 1/4" was light stock
3/32 7018 this is the rod to use if you are making suspension parts for lift kits or building a trailer. It strong, but much more important it's vibration resistant.
3/32" 7014 it's about the same as 6013, it just takes more juice. At work we called 6013 tin bashers rod, it was made for sheet metal work. I used it to repair guards. It's an very easy rod to use, easy striking, can look good too. For your first stick, pick up some to practice with. The frustration with it, the slag will cover the weld making it look like you have done a better job than you did.
3/32" 6011, easiest to strike, nasty to use, it's deep pentitrating(sp). this is the rod to use through rust and paint. It takes a different technique , whip and pause

On my machine the welder plugs were a bit of an odd ball, I modified Miller ones, the stringer and welding clamp I picked up at PA on sale.
Thanks, I'm not quite clear on which is easiest to start with, 7014 or 6013?
 

Downwindtracker2

Well-Known Member
They are about the same for ease. I'm burning 7014 at 98 amp or something, hard to see the display in the sun for an old phart, Where as when I was repairing guards I used 6013 at about 70 amp. Since my welding skills is not top notch, I tend to use less amps and take my time. 7014 book is about 110, that's hot to do sheet metal.

I had never used 7014 until now. At the fleamarket I bought some partial stainless boxes of rod and the unopened but water marked box of 7014 was thrown in, I dried it for a week. If it had been 7018, it would have had to be baked.
 

architect

Super User
Hi David,

I'm looking to get into welding and was looking at the AHP as well. If the APH would have shipped your decision would you have leaned towards it? I'm a bit torn between AHP and the Primeweld. My USA friend is able to bring either back for me so shipping is not an issue.

Thanks.
 

DavidR8

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Hi David,

I'm looking to get into welding and was looking at the AHP as well. If the APH would have shipped your decision would you have leaned towards it? I'm a bit torn between AHP and the Primeweld. My USA friend is able to bring either back for me so shipping is not an issue.

Thanks.
I would not have bought the AHP. I have read too many reports of fried boards and less than stellar customer service.
AHP and Everlast are owned by the same folks for whatever that's worth.
Primeweld has been the best company to deal with, bar none.
UPS lost my welder and Primeweld sent another, no questions asked. When the original showed up they gave me a refund off my order to return the replacement.
I see the same service recounted on the Primeweld FB group. Any problem (and there are very few) is immediately rectified.
Most notably a fellow in Pennsylvania had an issue and needed a replacement. Except he had since moved to Puerto Rico.
Primeweld shipped him a new unit, free of charge. Two day delivery time.
I'm a huge fan :)
 
Last edited:
Very interesting thread. I also am looking for a TIG machine. Saw some positive reviews for the AHP so had my heart set on one. Since they don't ship to Canada I had planned to have one shipped to the border and then I was going to carry it across and home the rest of the way. Just had to save my pennies. Before I got there the pandemic came and they closed the border. Plans were put on hold. Then I started finding stories about the AHP having problems and not lasting very long. Now not sure what I will do but haven't given up yet.
 

DavidR8

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Very interesting thread. I also am looking for a TIG machine. Saw some positive reviews for the AHP so had my heart set on one. Since they don't ship to Canada I had planned to have one shipped to the border and then I was going to carry it across and home the rest of the way. Just had to save my pennies. Before I got there the pandemic came and they closed the border. Plans were put on hold. Then I started finding stories about the AHP having problems and not lasting very long. Now not sure what I will do but haven't given up yet.

Including shipping and duty I paid $810 USD which is approx $1100 CDN.

I also looked hard at Everlast, the PowerTig AC/DC 185 was $1300 so for less money I got more amperage and a CK Worldwide 17 flexhead torch.
 

architect

Super User
Thanks David. Appreciate you sharing your research and insight -- it has convinced me to get the PrimeWeld as my first machine. I also want to get a second MIG machine like you but a Millermatic is out of my budget in this case :)
 

DavidR8

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Thanks David. Appreciate you sharing your research and insight -- it has convinced me to get the PrimeWeld as my first machine. I also want to get a second MIG machine like you but a Millermatic is out of my budget in this case :)

My pleasure! I think you will be happy with the Primeweld.
My Millermatic is nothing to write home about, just a small 130A, 110v unit that I bought at a farm auction twenty years ago.


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Dabbler

ersatz engineer
Your TIG is an uber sophisticated, refined process welder. My TIG has amperage. no foot control. preflow and post flow are handled by the button on the torch to release gas. That's it.

--WOW nice machine!
 

DavidR8

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Your TIG is an uber sophisticated, refined process welder. My TIG has amperage. no foot control. preflow and post flow are handled by the button on the torch to release gas. That's it.

--WOW nice machine!
Thanks! I can say that it's far more capable than its owner! :)
In all seriousness, the level of adjustment is one of the selling features for me. It's not as essential for mild steel but for stainless and aluminum it makes it really capable.
Folks with years of experience have said they run as good as or better than some multi-thousand dollar Millers.
 
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