YYC - Resurface turbo exhaust manifold

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Moderator
Premium Member
Ford 2 piece sparkplugs.....

Ya, that was a major bummer. So was the GM gasoline engine block converted to run on diesel, Chrysler's first electronic transmission, Mitsubishi's engine running on unleaded, Honda's block cracking and oil dilution, etc etc. They prolly all sounded like great ideas at the time.

There is a very long embarrassing list.
 

CWret

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Engineering is an art and science combined.
Engineering is sometimes referred to as "Applied Science". Science gives the tools needed to design/build things. Experience (and/or R&D) is where the art comes in. The need for accuracy and reliability varies greatly depending on the required/desired outcome. Cars are vastly better now than a few decades ago. When I was a kid, every driveway had a spot where the oil motor left its make. It was just expected that after a couple of years a car would leak oil. Gaskets and oil sealing methodology have certainly improved. Cars then also had grease fittings everywhere. Things could be built better today and result in less downtime but there are trade-offs. Building a typical family car with greatly improved reliability over the competitor would be a tough showroom sell when the consumer sees the sudden price jump. Continuously improving the things we build (back to the art part) is how we've done it in the past and I expect we will continue down that path.

CW
 

Susquatch

Ultra Member
Moderator
Premium Member
Back to gaskets - in my world (high-pressure pipe fittings), we don't use smooth surfaces. Spiral phonograph surface finishes and a lot of bolt torque.

The sealing is more impacted by gasket creep than by surface finish or even flange alignment.


I'm a wee bit gun shy here, but yes, that was my point exactly. It's often very important to match the surface finish with the gasket and joint characteristics. Especially with joint situations where the gasket is at risk of being blown out as often happens with cylinder head gaskets.
 

Darren

Ultra Member
Premium Member
I have resealed hundreds of timing covers, oil pans, etc where the factory sealant failed due to the surfaces being too smooth for the sealant to bond. Roughen them up and they never fail again. On exhaust manifolds, with steel gaskets,its less important. If they are soft gaskets, a rough surface, ie 60 grit, will hold them better.
 
Ya, that was a major bummer. So was the GM gasoline engine block converted to run on diesel, Chrysler's first electronic transmission, Mitsubishi's engine running on unleaded, Honda's block cracking and oil dilution, etc etc. They prolly all sounded like great ideas at the time.

There is a very long embarrassing list.
Sitting in the armchair and playing quarterback the day after the game is easy........ The flip side of that is "he who does nothing, makes no mistakes."
If everything went as planned, we'd all still be living in Rome.....:cool:
....... All this coming from a guy that seems to make enough mistakes for all of us. :p
 
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