Reverse Engineering from a 3D Scan with Fusion360

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
This might interest some of you Fusion-360 users, although the thrust of the video is 3D CAD modeler agnostic once you have the magic wand & freebie software mentioned. With the mesh scan imported & aligned to appropriate planes as he shows, the rest of process is analogous to building a 3D model from scratch. I foresee projects like this in my future one day but have not delved into the hardware scanner. The price range is crazy wide & I'm not quite sure what fits the purpose. Anyone else messed around with this?

 

Degen

Ultra Member
Premium Member
During Covid (or during a break last fall) I was at the machinery show in Mississauga and saw the free hand 3d scanning laser systems in use, amazing....to say the least.

I also saw an automated 3d measuring probe set up. The accuracy OMG (well beyond my abilities to machine at this point). $25K allows you to play.
 

Dan Dubeau

Well-Known Member
Interesting video. I'll probably have to watch it again to extract all the info.

I bought a revopoint Pop2 during their kickstarter last winter, but aside from playing around with the demos, and a few other quick attempt at scanning the kids heads and a few other household objects I haven't used it since. He makes it all look easy. I hope to get to that point someday.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Keep me posted as you start messing around with yours. My intent is much like the video - basically importing a 3D scan from an object, but with the specific purpose of developing a ground up 3D cad model, more or less using the scan as a background reference layer to turn on/off visually as the modelling progresses. So some level off scan resolution/accuracy is required, but not to the Nth degree like some other applications. I know a lot of folks, what I'll affectionately call 'creature modelers' import the scan & they want to capture as much of the detail as possible & physically manipulate the mesh before 3D printing or whatever. That's not me. If you find any good links on the hardware or usage, feel free to post. I'm in no particular hurry but curious.
 

Tom O

Ultra Member
I’ve got the Makerbot scanner that I’ve only used a couple times there are plans out there for using the video head sensors (most pawn shops 5/10 bucks) and lidar on my phone I haven’t played with that either. Lol
 

Mcgyver

Ultra Member
I know a lot of folks, what I'll affectionately call 'creature modelers' import the scan & they want to capture as much of the detail as possible & physically manipulate the mesh before 3D printing or whatever. That's not me.

You and I, we're 1%'s. The one percent of 3D scanning and printing folks with no interest in Orcs.

I recently bought a Revopoint mini, which is their newest, highest resolution offering, .02mm resolution. Its a blue laser which is better for small detail (apparently). Its less well suited for larger objects, faces, cars etc - Dan's is better for that, but the mini seems just the thing for fine detail. While its not exactly cheap, its 5 or 10% of what the high detail industrial models are....consumer priced 3D scanning seems to me is an emerging area that can't help but be of intreset to us shop types.

Their test bust scans well, but its been really difficult to get scans of other things. I've had to buy 3D scanning spray, and its still very challenging. There is a huge will to help from the vendor, but an also a language barrier. Software is ok, but its not slick. Lots left unsaid in documents and manuals. For me, it wasn't plug and play with great results, its a struggle and I'm still in that phase. Between this and my casting adventures, many days I push it aside and head to garage to machine something knowing its a 95% chance of success vs, well, almost single digits. (but I shall perserver....another bronze coming up in a few hours!)

Great video btw, really good to know how go from mesh to CAD
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Interesting comments @Mcgyver please keep me informed as you progress.
My Spidey sense was its probably not that slam dunk a process as its sometimes made out to be. I suspect the devil is in the details - hardware, software, technique...

I keep stumbling on these camera (or in this case phone) methods that look surprisingly good. Now obviously the software is driving the 3D image stitching. At one point it shows a missing or unresolved sliver. But dang, if my purpose was purely as a background mesh image to reference for a ground-up CAD process, that looks pretty good. I have seen some examples of objects where it failed miserably & they had to get into sprays & reference dots & other higher end techniques. If I recall it was something like a motorcycle & it kind of blew its marbles on head fins & other tricky, dimensionally finer features. They came out smeared & distorted. But that was a long time ago by development pace standards.

 
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