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Calf Carrier

Ironman

Ultra Member
It's going to be very difficult to force us to feast on insects, so this time of year is all about babies being born. My customer came to me with a Ticktok video which was fairly useless, and wanted me to make a calf carrier for their quads. The useful thing about the ticktoc vid was it showed a carrier at right angles to the ones shown on Youtube. The Utube ones left me shaking my head:eek:
So this is the second one I've done and I had to build a hitch receiver for it first, as this quad never had one. My design sort of needs a receiver tube.
It's fairly simple to use. You grab the calf and slide it in from the end, feet off the ground it's going nowhere. A chain or bungy across the rear and you can drive it to the barn or wherever, and it won't come out. If you are ear tagging and doing the vitamins and other inoculations in the field, you can put a strap over the neck support and go to work.
If it is an abandoned calf it is easy for one person to deal with and transport, etc.
 

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DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Looks alright! Careful legs don't get too close to knobby tires ( a rear shield might be needed).
 

6.5 Fan

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Looks useful, i use a side by side that has a box on the back. Brought a few in with that, just walked a new baby in a few minutes ago. Fortunately it was up and moving and momma is very quiet, just needs a couple of hours in the warm room to dry off.
 

DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
Looks useful, i use a side by side that has a box on the back. Brought a few in with that, just walked a new baby in a few minutes ago. Fortunately it was up and moving and momma is very quiet, just needs a couple of hours in the warm room to dry off.
My brother's and I were laughing awhile ago about how when we didn't have any sort of equipment (or know better) we'd pick up the new calf and walk or often run with it to a new location with killer mamma cow trailing us. I never did much of that myself cuz I was not as big and strong as my brothers, but even for young and strong guys it was a dumb thing to do and we were lucky nobody got trampled by a killer cow.
 
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DPittman

Ultra Member
Premium Member
We don't keep cranky ass cows around. Life is to short to get stomped into the ground by a walking steak.
Yes that's my brothers philosophy now too but in the early days there were some that certainly did not get culled early enough. Now they ain't got no patience for those types either.
 

Bandit

Super User
My father would say "some of them only have one of only 2 things to do, die the most expensive way possible, or try to hurt/kill you." The first year we were ranching, he carried a micky of brandy, to give them a "little pickem up" when the calves were born. The second year, he was carrying one also, but it was to make him feel a bit better if they died. After a few years, we had the "bad" ones culled out.
 

LenVW

Process Machinery Designer
Premium Member
It's going to be very difficult to force us to feast on insects, so this time of year is all about babies being born. My customer came to me with a Ticktok video which was fairly useless, and wanted me to make a calf carrier for their quads. The useful thing about the ticktoc vid was it showed a carrier at right angles to the ones shown on Youtube. The Utube ones left me shaking my head:eek:
So this is the second one I've done and I had to build a hitch receiver for it first, as this quad never had one. My design sort of needs a receiver tube.
It's fairly simple to use. You grab the calf and slide it in from the end, feet off the ground it's going nowhere. A chain or bungy across the rear and you can drive it to the barn or wherever, and it won't come out. If you are ear tagging and doing the vitamins and other inoculations in the field, you can put a strap over the neck support and go to work.
If it is an abandoned calf it is easy for one person to deal with and transport, etc.
You might want to get some OLD shag carpet and wrap it around the contact area of the tubes.
Duct Tape ’or‘ Anchor the carpet pieces to the frame with FHCS.
Be careful you don’t create any ‘pinch’ points for the calve.
(I wrestled with a few hundred calves when I was younger)
 

Ironman

Ultra Member
I was concerned about the exhaust, but these are not being driven hard.
Calves don't kick sideways but they will kick to the rear, which is facing the open end. Never a problem with the newborns, but the older ones can kick hard.
As this is not my quad and not my calves, it is up to them what they do. I'm just the iron butcher. When discussing this with them, I have brought up things like exhaust and such and that is all I can do, but I did mount it so the head was not in the exhaust.
 
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