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My Mini machine upgrades

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#1
image.jpg image.jpg So with the closing of my lighting season just a few days away, I decided to take some time and address some issues with my mini machines so I'm ready for hobby season.

I started with adjusting the gibs on my ct704's compound and cross slide, the "back side" was lifting off the bed slightly when moving the compound so tolerance was out the window.
Then it is time to address the ct605's feed and fine feed mechanism, to start that off I wanted a Knob on the dial so I made one.

And over then next few days I will adjust some of the backlash out of the headstock on the X2 in the feed mechanism components.

Teaser "shim"

Ps images rotated dunno why
 

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Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#2
image.jpg image.jpg I am realizing I'm bad with taking pictures during projects, but here is how I fixed most of the backlash on the cx605. When I bought the thing new it had metal banding keeping things together. I picked up a shop tip from you tube (who I cannot recall) where they cut the banding into strips for shim stock, kept nice and neat in the "r8 Bridgeport styled removal bolt cover" (bolt protector cup) and it just so happens that 2 of these is just perfect for the build out I needed to eliminate the gear mis alignment. I used 8 pre cut pieces and moved the milling head up and down manually while I fiddled with keeping them where I needed them to stay. In the end I used grease as a glue and things are much more controlled on the dial
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#3
We'll I've stopped my work here as a result of the belt drive upgrade I ebayed blowing out the drive belt that came with it and being unsuccessful in locating a supply I have purchased the "my little machine shop.com" version as I already have 2 replacement belts form my mis adventures in v-belt location. I'll add that content here as well. The kit I ordered comes with the gas assist arm and extended range kits included too, after shipping and fairly weak dollar it's a little over $350 but without it my machine is useless as I've already busted the plastic set they build them with:mad:.
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#4
image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg So I've received the package from my little machine shop.com. I'm not impressed at all sure it's all there an got here gas as it should have but whoever they have working to manufacture the belt drive pieces is a monkey or high school class. So I have a pully with metal chunks in the keyway for the motor side because broaching was done prior to the drill and tap operation for the set screw. Basically the rep told me that they are all like that and to bad unless you want to spend a small fortune sending and receiving replacements until you find one manufactured properly. Also many of the edges on the belt conversion were left unbroken and sharp enough to cut your finger right out of the box

NEVER AGAIN WILL I SPEND MY MONEY AT MYLITTLEMACHINESHOP.COM

I'm going to have to attack it with a file and hope I don't mess up the keyway tolerance, and debur it before I attempt to attach it so I don't bleed all over the place.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#5
LMS is typical Asian stuff so with that comes good & not-so-good.

Are you saying the keyway profile is incomplete or the issue is the burr left over from drilling & tapping hole protruding into the keyway? If its just the hole, I'd try is an undersized HSS square bit sharpened edged on the end like a chisel, then just try & plane off that burr. That way every edge is 'safe'. If you go in there with a file chances are greater of removing side material. Another option is put tape on both sides of the file so only the bottom cuts. If the keyway is incomplete, that's a bigger headache. I'd have to think.

De-chamfering the aluminum edges shouldn't be too dramatic. Sometimes files can bite & give undesirable results as a function of the cutting teeth angle & how the file can approach it. (Kind of the mill file issue vs. regular file). But the finest tooth file you have will work best. Pre-paint it with a dark Sharpy & you can see exactly how it progresses. If its just a bit of sharp edge, wrap some 600 on a piece of scrap square section & knock it down, aluminum is pretty soft. I made myself a whole batch of disposable sanding sticks like this, various grits wet-o-dry with spray adhesive on MDF. I'll take some pics if your'e interested. Dead easy & work nice on aluminum
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#6
Some of my el-cheapo homebrew sanding sticks. I cut a batch of sticks from 1/8" or 1/4" thick MDF or hardboard. Then I grab a sheet of common wet-o-dry abrasive paper, spray the back with spray adhesive. Then just position the wood on the sticky side & cut the perimeter with a knife. Flip it over & do the other side. This gives you more life & equalizes the glue joint so prevents warping. You can also go around the edges for that matter but I find the thin side usually lets go. The spray adhesive stands up pretty good, but just be careful with liquids. Water will swell MDF & fluids like WD40 (which works good on aluminum) can act as a solvent & loosen the glue. Popsicle sticks & tongue depressors seemed like a good idea but I find for the most part they are slightly curved. You could use aluminum strips for that matter but I use these on the lathe & would rather impale my hand or fling a projectile of wood vs. metal. To remove old paper, acetone usually removes it clean & you can get some life out of the wood. Keep in mind for those 1-off jobs where regular tools don't work.
 

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Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#7
So now well into the re build I discover that more of my kit parts are incomplete ... There is an unthreaded rod end and the block designed to hold the head stock is 10mm short of the specified length. This smaller one aligned the holes with the bolts joining the 2head stock pieces. FMLMS.com
 

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Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#8
Glad this thread still exists, but its a good time on and well ... this happened. HoHoHo image.jpg i learned a ton from this project like how to cutting glass and magnetic strip orientation are important.

I totaly ordered one of my scales absurdly long at 500mm but after looking at the per unit price to order another, i opted to opener up and look inside . What i found was simple glass held in alum channel with bits of rubber string and a "pick up". Resize and run with it ... oops should have tested first as i encountered the magneic strips orientation is important at the first test ... not pre test, final assembaly test. :oops:
 

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RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#9
So you were able the successfully shorten a glass scale to the length you needed? Does it still work well? You mentioned the magnetic strip; I guess it is inside the glass tube for protection from grime? Did you take a picture before you assembled it? Sorry for all the questions: never had one apart and am curious.

Am thinking about putting a DRO on my mill - big decision point is how long do the scales need to be. Seems that if one can modify them (well, shorten them) then that makes it a bit easier as far as choosing the length. Just as long as I get them long enough...
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#10
I will snap some pics of the spare parts, i was also concerned about scale lengths and over measured for fear of coming up short, and luckly its not quite rocket appliences but pretty close. Basicaly a magnetic strip is laid on a glass plate and the pickup is just a fancy roller skate that glides along it, glass cutter makes proper sizing easy and a super small tap for the end caps when cutting the channel length. 100% custom if you order oversized scales and cut to length ... price from ebay to my place was close to $400 all in for full 3axis, delivered in about a week via DHL
 

Alexander

Super User
Administrator
#11
Cool project. I would never have thought to cut it shorter. These DRO kits are a big investment but they make machining parts less stressful.
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#12
I thought the same. But when the price of a single scale from the same seller was half again what i paid already it was science or spend lol
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#14
IMG_0235.JPG I dont have any rubber string left to show yet, i used it as cheap insurance in the other scales. But it keeps the glass upright with pressure and some kind of silicone glue. I went with the full function rather than the single scale X3 with individual screens because i watched others on youtube do that system and the track is so exposed and requires the same amount of space for mounting, although the long travel kit already installed played a huge part as it frees up a whole side of the mill, otherwise i would have still gone full function 2 axis for bolt hole circles more specifically. This is a section of the glass i likely chipped and scratched taking it apart like a troglodyte, and did drop once thats why its two pieces, but still works it seems
 

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RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#15
Thanks for sharing the pics Bofobo! Much appreciated.

From the aluminum cross section it almost looks like there could be another row of wipers installed below the yellow ones you have. I wonder if is the difference between a Mitutoyo, ACU-RITE, etc, and the more economically priced ones?
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#16
Well i searched Mitutoyo Dro on ebay and i can tell you from this picture IMG_0243.PNG That the insides are exactly the same ... if i were to disassemble mine and do a side by side photo you could not tell any difference.

the accu-rite ones look of a different style altogether, it appears also that 2 types of connections are available. Also some you tubers have made mention of cutting to size this style IMG_0244.PNG but ive not done it to confirm
 

RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#20
That’s great stuff to know. I’ll just make sure the scales are long enough and cut them to length if required. Thanks everybody.