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My collet blocks

DPittman

Active Member
#1
This certainly can't compare to the fantastic machining projects other have posted on this site but rather reflects the range of skills of the members on here....
The only milling I'm capable of is done on my homemade milling attachment for my Asian 10x22 lathe so I figured these blocks would be OK for the occasional hex or flat spot I wanted to mill on round stock. Yes I know the accuracy of them won't be great but for my purposes I think they will do. I also realize that the aluminum would not likely hold the collet well if used in a turning operation but I think for light milling they will be fine. I used my existing collet holder nut. My collet system is a rather odd OZ25 designation and collet blocks don't seem to be available anyhow.

Don
 

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Everett

Active Member
#2
Hey, if they suit your purpose and the price is right, nothing wrong with them! They look good from the pictures, for what it's worth.
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#3
Don, I'm not quite sure I follow what you did. But maybe its along the same lines as what I was contemplating - buy a cheapo import ER collet shank & mill flats on the shank like a 4-side square or 6 side hex. The only downside is with ER you don't have much internal clearance so one would also have to drill out the center. Whereas the 5C you can pass longer stock right through. Also the shank might be pretty hard stuff. Is that what you did?

They make dedicated ER blocks too starting at 25 which look better than my idea & have pass-through hole I think. But they are quite short & from what can see, the nut is always bigger than the block so it has to be proud of the jaws.
https://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/catalogue/results.aspx?search=collet+block
 

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DPittman

Active Member
#4
Sorry Peter my post wasn't particularly explanatory. A couple more pics might help.

I simply turned down aluminum with the proper inside collet taper and outside threads to fit my existing collet system and then I attached them to existing hex and square stock.

I did not drill the aluminum through to allow stock to pass through but that could easily be done. Realistically I doubt I will have the need to mill on long lengths, but ya never know!

Happy New Year! IMG_20190101_0942054~01.jpg IMG_20190101_0942353~01.jpg
 
#5
Nice work on the collet blocks. I think the aluminum will get a beating from the hardened spring steel collets though.
I bought ER32 & ER25 collet chucks with straight shanks and through holes. I drilled and bored out hex and square stock to slip the collet chucks into. Used a clamp like a lathe tailstock clamp to secure them in the blocks. Stock pieces are larger than the nuts so they can be clamped right to the table. Works awesome and cost was minimal. Planning to add octagonal blocks, and maybe pentagonal ones.

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DPittman

Active Member
#6
Nice work on the collet blocks. I think the aluminum will get a beating from the hardened spring steel collets though.
I bought ER32 & ER25 collet chucks with straight shanks and through holes. I drilled and bored out hex and square stock to slip the collet chucks into. Used a clamp like a lathe tailstock clamp to secure them in the blocks. Stock pieces are larger than the nuts so they can be clamped right to the table. Works awesome and cost was minimal. Planning to add octagonal blocks, and maybe pentagonal ones.

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Yes I know aluminum isn't ideal, but I figured I would only be doing very occasional and light milling with them. My milling has to be done on an asian bench top lathe, so you can imagine that it would be pretty light duty work.
Yes your straight shank chucks is the way to do it but I already had my collet setup, so I wanted to make use of it.
 

RobinHood

Active Member
Premium Member
#7
Yes I know aluminum isn't ideal, but I figured I would only be doing very occasional and light milling with them.
You know, whatever works to get the job done. If you upgrade your milling capabilities in the future, you can always use the new machine and make them out of steel; you’ll already have protoypes to copy.