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Lathe Purchase, move, setup and Lathe Stand build

#1
Many of you have followed and commented on my thread that started with me looking for a lathe. This has now turned into multiple projects and I figured we should move it into the proper spot.

For those of you that dont know, here is a quick summary.

- I purchased a 12x36 lathe
- I needed to build a stand for the lathe
- I need to move the lathe into my basement

So, starting with the stand. I am very close to being done.
I built the stand using a bunch of scrap 2x2 and 1x3 box tubing I was able to scrounge up. The right chamber needed to be large enough to fit a tool cabinet in it and the left chamber will eventually get two large shelves installed for extra clutter, errr ahh, I mean storage.....

here are some pictures.
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IMG_1479.JPG

And here is the first coat of lipstick on this pig

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Lessons learned
- The lipped flange around the tool cabinets cannot be removed. So measure to include the biggest part of that flanged lip.
- The drip tray did NOT sit flush. The edges sat lower then the main body. This forced me to add 1/2" flat bar to my main support beams so that when I place the bed of the lathe on the drip tray it doesnt fold in the edges. (I should have caught that sooner and built it into my design)
- I was aiming for the main apron handwheel to be level with my elbow. Now, I knew that using that tool cabinet would make the stand very tall, but I am also around 6'2"-6'3" So I went for it. I think I am going to be a little tall for my liking so I will probable have to build a small platform to stand on while working. (I dont mind though as It will be softer to stand on then the concrete) BUT, if I were to do it again I would build the legs a little shorter and rely more on the adjustable leveling feet to add the height.


Next post
Moving the lathe
 
#2
Moving the lathe.
This is going to make some people cringe. JohnW should probably just skip this post.

Originally what we discussed was this. I was planning on stripping off everything down to Just the headstock and bed. Then with some special rigging get 4 strong backs to just pick it up and move it into my basement. I was very worried about this because it was still bloody heavy and I could see us damaging walls, floors and if any single person slipped during this maneuver it would most likely result in a severe injury. I also would have needed to coordinate and borrow a shop crane to offload from the back of the truck and also coordinate its use in my basement to place it on the stand.

I fretted over this all holidays.

I caved and yesterday I removed the headstock (I am sheltering my self from attempts to smack me in the back of the head)

BUT, removing the headstock made it incredibly easy to move. We placed a pipe through the splindle and two people were able to pick it up and move it directly down into the basement with no issues. The bed could now stand up on end and sit on top of a dolly which again made it very easy to move down the stairs. So, the move took 2 people and no crane. I plan on using just two people to place the components on the stand and reassemble the lathe on this weekend.

Disclaimer, I have a professional machinist helping me out with realigning the headstock, he has done it a few times and is confident and comfortable with doing it and doing it accurately.

No real lessons learned on this one. Moving the lathe like that was incredibly easy and straight forward. (Opinion might change putting it back together)

My next post will be reassembly and possibly headstock alignment (This wont be till the weekend)
 
#3
I think it might be in this vid ,it's in one of his anyway, but Wes aligns a headstock. In these imports ,it's surprisingly easy.
I generally ignore YouTube vids of younger producers, but this guy seems to know what he's doing.
 
#4
I have left the headstock intact so I dont need to rebuild the head although the vid above is great reference to have.
I need to perform something more along the lines of this vid.


(Disclaimer I didnt watch this vid, I just pulled it quickly as an example)
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#5
The stand looks great. What paint & application method did you use?

The lathe head tramming video is exactly the operation I was talking about earlier. Even though you didn't remove head, its good you are aware of this readjustment after you get it set up. Most guys start adjusting the feet ie. altering lathe bed twist, usually called lathe leveling which is a misnomer. But but if you have a lathe with detachable head stock & set screws to alter headstock yaw, that needs to be dealt with because it has a bigger impact on taper cutting misalignment.
 
#8
The stand was rock solid and level without the leveling feet. Its should be awesome when its all dialed in and complete.
I just used some tremclad metal paint with a foam roller. Put on a couple thick coats. Looks great up close. Will see how the durability is once I start using it. There were some hard to reach places around the tool cabinet which look like poop but it is really hard to find.
 
#9
The stand was rock solid and level without the leveling feet. Its should be awesome when its all dialed in and complete.
I just used some tremclad metal paint with a foam roller. Put on a couple thick coats. Looks great up close. Will see how the durability is once I start using it. There were some hard to reach places around the tool cabinet which look like poop but it is really hard to find.
If I had more time and it was warmer out I would have used an HVLP gun.... but I rushed it so I can get to the real project which is using the lathe ;)
**And like I said above, the foam roller actually looks great close up
 
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PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#10
That's exactly how I painted my mill stand & I think it looks good for the intended purpose. The foam roller does a good job of giving an even texture, plus its faster. The paint is quite viscous so brush application always looks looks like it was done with a brush. Mine looks more like budget powder coating LOL. If I ever did a loving restoration project I'd probably prime & spray with something bulletproof like Endura.
 
#11
I've used General Paint Industrial enamel . It's pretty thick stuff and nasty , but it dries hard and doesn't seem affected by oil. You can get it colour tinted, mine is a cream that matches the mill/drill. I also made a splash guard.
 
#12
That's exactly how I painted my mill stand & I think it looks good for the intended purpose. The foam roller does a good job of giving an even texture, plus its faster. The paint is quite viscous so brush application always looks looks like it was done with a brush. Mine looks more like budget powder coating LOL. If I ever did a loving restoration project I'd probably prime & spray with something bulletproof like Endura.
lol
my exact same thoughts!
 
#13
I've used General Paint Industrial enamel . It's pretty thick stuff and nasty , but it dries hard and doesn't seem affected by oil. You can get it colour tinted, mine is a cream that matches the mill/drill. I also made a splash guard.
I was temped to play with that stuff. How is it to work with?
Did you just apply with a brush then?
 
#14
Oh, one thing JohnW will like to see..... is the back splash guard for the lathe had all the paint flaking off of it when I bought it. Long story short someone powder coated it free of charge..... so thats going to look great when it is all together (Yes will post pictures when that happens). Colour doesnt match perfect, but hey, its going to get metal chips thrown at it all day long, so I am not too worried.
 
#15
I just used a brush, I'm not that fussy about finish. I can't be ,I'm the one doing the painting. Besides, what can you expect with dollar store paint brushes. I have used it with a HVLP gun . That was my first try at spraying anything. But be warned, we used it at work, it's thick and nasty. General Paint has closed it's store, or more likely renamed it Sherwin Williams and doesn't sell GP paint anymore. I'm using Metalclad, Dulux brand now and I'm pleased with both the results and price. I think Dulux is another PPG brand.
 
#19
Got the lathe mounted up and put back together.

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Everything went incredibly smooth. The headstock alignment wasn’t that bad. We got it to within 3/10th of a thou over 12”

Will give more info later when I am at my computer and not trying to type on my cell.