Hardinge DV59 lathe

Canadium

Active Member
#1
I'm curious what people on this forum think about these Hardinge lathes. There seem to be quite a few of them around in my area and I almost got one once. What attracted me is that they are supposed to be high precision. However it looks to me like they are designed for mass production of small parts and have limited functionality so not really a good hobbyist lathe.

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-other-busin...-dv59-precision-lathe-dovetail-bed/1557779599

hardinge.JPG
 

Canadium

Active Member
#3
As I understand it a lot of the operations done on these lathes do not require tailstocks and most often a tailstock would not be required.
 

francist

Super User
Premium Member
#4
Indeed, primarily a second operation lathe. Great if you have to perform a specific function time after time after time (like facing bushings similar to the three brass ones lying in the chip pan) but not to useful for random shop functions. I suspect there is also a good potential for concentrated wear on the sliding parts given that they tend to run in a pretty specific sweet spot all day long.
 

David_R8

Scrapper of metal
Premium Member
#5
Note that they don’t have a lead screw.
The only means of moving the tool towards the chuck is via the compound.
I’d say as a second lathe sure, but I wouldn’t want one as my only lathe.


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Dabbler

Ultra Member
#6
2nd op lathes seldom have a tailstock - unless it is a turret.

Hardinge makes great lathes, but many of the models are special purpose, not really great for hobby work.
 
#8
A fellow I used to do business with from Ontario made screw sets for antique rifles. Never seen his lathe but he said he used a Hardinge for all his repetitious work. Expensive little buggers but those screws he made were perfect replicas of originals from late 1800's....lost track of him, sure wish I'd of bought a box full at the time.
 

Tom Kitta

Ultra Member
#9
One of these in Calgary few months back sold for I think under $200. In good working order they usually go for like 300 or so.

They are so cheap b/c they are second operation lathes - i.e. production machines not for hobby use.

Parts from them can be usually interchangeable with other lathes of same brand - so the accessories are worth much more then the lathe itself.
 

Canadium

Active Member
#10
One of these in Calgary few months back sold for I think under $200. In good working order they usually go for like 300 or so.

They are so cheap b/c they are second operation lathes - i.e. production machines not for hobby use.

Parts from them can be usually interchangeable with other lathes of same brand - so the accessories are worth much more then the lathe itself.
I never see them that cheap over here. I've seen anywhere from 1000 - 5000. Saw someone on another forum call one out at a US auction that went for 14000.
 

Crankit

Active Member
Premium Member
#12
There was a HLV with a turret tailstock for sale in Kamloops a few years ago with an asking price of $800 if I remember correctly. Kicker was the seller was keeping the motor/drive system for it...was up for a month+ before it sold
 

Canadium

Active Member
#13
I think you are confusing an actual full machinist lathe with second op lathes. They are all over the place for next to nothing - see for example:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hardinge-S...221220?hash=item44629cd424:g:B5UAAOSwdhNfmxHE

Add accessories to above such as full collet set and price will go easily to over 1000. Add a chuck and make it into a turret model and price will easily go over 2000.
I'm definitely assuming some basic parts like a cross slide and turret tailstock on a DV-59 model or similar. On this website in US they have listing as high as 12000 CAD
https://www.machinio.com/hardinge/dv-59/lathes#results
 
#14
Well, they can list it for 120,000 if they want to but it will not sell :)

Realistic price is far lower - as most sane people would go for true first operation lathe not "upgraded" DV-59 that claims it is now "first operation" lathe. Certainly adding tailstock etc. improves the price, but I would certainly not price it even with collet closer, chuck, full collet set above 3000 for relatively new model.
 

Dabbler

Ultra Member
#15
BTW the headstock on most 2nd op harding lathes can be tricky. I've seen the ones that have no hope of mounting trad chucks on them whtout replaceing the spindle. Those ones only work with a collet closer.
 
#16
Like the guys said in previous posts they are a second op lathe. Ive owned a DSM59 for a few years now, which is the same basic lathe but with a turret and a lever cross slide. Im sure they are capable of doing a lot more than I do with mine, but the only time mine gets turned on is to do some production work ive got going. Great machine for that type of work, and now that Ive used one I cant imagine using my other lathes on those jobs.
There is all types of tooling available to do most operations with this type of lathe but im finding that they are all high priced and imo arent worth even close to that.
Have fun...