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Face Milling Cutters

#1
Have an older face milling tool without any markings most likely made off shore that requires a new set of 6 carbide tipped tool bits.
Would really hate to throw this this item away being so well built.

It may be possible to convert the head for indexable carbide tooling however I don't possess the necessary skills for that.

Unserviceable cutters measure 1/2 inch square x 1.5 inches long. Hat screw size 5.8 mm x 20.3 mm O/A length.
Smaller hole size 6.4 mm with larger hole size being 10.9 mm. Can't seem to find anything using Google.

Check out my photos as they offer some idea what I'm up against.

All suggestions welcome.

Bill
 

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#3
Thanks Tom much appreciated however where does one purchase same ???
At 81 years young I'm somewhat new to machine tooling and repairs.

Can you point me in the right direction?

Bill
 

Dabbler

Well-Known Member
#5
Raw carbide is available online. Kinnemetal used to sell 1"X.130"X4" sticks, but I'm pretty sure they've discontinued it. I have a couple of these sticks left from which we can fabricate you some new cutters.

However, my first try would be to remove your current carbides and remount them backwards and resharpen them. Any way it would be a bit of a project, but doable. First thing in getting new carbide is to know the dimensions.

I for sure wouldn't throw this away - it looks like a shop made tool, but very high quality.
 
#6
For Tom & Dabbler, grinding is basically out of the question as one carbide cutter is totally missing with the remainder badly chipped.

What little is left has been ground down far beyond their original shape to the point where the tool presents a safety hazard.
Unfortunately these things are not readily available in sunny downtown Moose Jaw or Regina have tried that.

Off and on over the past year I've explored refurbishing this project without success. Presently I'm laid up after knee replacement so thought I'd have another go during my down time.

As mentioned earlier I'm open to suggestions.

Bill
 
#8
Hi Dabbler, enjoyed your Pablo Picasso comments sort of fits with what I'm up to at aged 81. You see my father was a die setter with the Stanley Steel plant in Hamilton, ON. Yes the very same company that makes saws and hinges. So here I am trying to learn something of what he knew from a tool room perspective. Outside of my lame knee I'm in very good health says my doctor. And yes I'm a volunteer with the Vintage Aircraft Restorers group at the Western Development Museum here in Moose Jaw although unable to get there with my bum leg and my not being allowed to drive as yet.

Getting back to measuring the old carbides with my funky office calipers (good sets are in my shop) and I'm unable to go there. Actually what little is left of the used carbides come out something like this.

(0.13" thick) by (0.30" long) by (0.26" wide) partly recessed into the tool shank with the back end being somewhat rounded, see photo.

<snip>
I have a couple of these sticks left from which we can fabricate you some new cutters.
Was not aware that carbide came in sticks., how does one cut them???

Bill
 

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Dabbler

Well-Known Member
#9
My dad worked at Stelco for 42 years in Hamilton - small world! I used to go thru the 'jaw' on the way to speedy creek at least 4 times a year - but not so much these days. We have another member there in Moose Jaw, I think...

Cutting carbides is far easier than you'd think... I usually use a Dremel to score it then break it along the line. I shape on a green wheel and then use a diamond stone to get the final edge.

I'm sure we can detach the carbides and silver solder new ones on. then we need to sharpen them in place. Mostly just work...
 
#10
My dad worked at Stelco for 42 years in Hamilton - small world! I used to go thru the 'jaw' on the way to speedy creek at least 4 times a year - but not so much these days. We have another member there in Moose Jaw, I think...

Cutting carbides is far easier than you'd think... I usually use a Dremel to score it then break it along the line. I shape on a green wheel and then use a diamond stone to get the final edge.

I'm sure we can detach the carbides and silver solder new ones on. then we need to sharpen them in place. Mostly just work...
 
#11
Hi Dabbler small world indeed, I was born 1938 Mt Hamilton hospital, raised and educated what is now Stoney Creek (greater Hamilton).
Between the years of age 10 to 15 often went to the Stanley plant while Dad repaired and set up a machine for the coming Monday.
Would venture down the street some to the man made bay at Stelco. Sitting in that bay were many WW2 war ships of all sizes soon to be cut up and melted down. Unknown to me at the time HMCS Moos Jaw was among the lot. Also went to Saltfleet high school before enlisting with the RCAF in 1955. Uncertain when Saltfleet high school was torn down. And yes I worked at Stoney Creek dairy during summer months while in my teens. Wow!

Getting back to carbides I am not a welder with minimal knowledge as to brazing. Question: would you be willing to take this job on?
Of course I would pay you to do that plus materials and shipping costs. Like you mentioned earlier I too believe this facing tool is well built however we now live in a throw away society and purchasing an off shore indexable model might be a cheaper option.

Should you be interested kindly contact me off list at <moderated out> and we'll work from there. Although I'm not mobile I could easily package the item and ship it out. Your call.....

Beyond that it will be another month or so before I can return to my shop work. Had my right knee replaced here Nov 15th then things turned sour five weeks later with a serious infection. Second replacement January 4th in Regina so I'm hurting badly trying to get my swollen leg to function like normal after two back to back surgeries. Talk about having cabin fever.

Bill
 
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#12
They look suspiciously like ordinary brazed carbide lathe tool bits to me. Why not buy a handful set up a vice stop (so their all the same length) and drill the mounting hole and counter bore?
 
#13
Hello ducdon

Thank you for your suggestion.

Yes I first explored that option and haven't completely ruled it out. Looking closer at my photo you will see the carbide tooling I require is no where the business end of a AR8-C6. The carbide recessed portion running back on most if not all AR8-C6 weakens the metric hat strength advantage. Another screw head with sufficient side clearance and hold ability might be another option.

Bill
 

Tom Kitta

Active Member
#14
They sell raw carbide bits on ebay in quantities of like a 100 for say around $30 or so USD.

These are the bits that later on can be brazed onto steel. I tried to buy these few times for cheap like ($10) but never made it. I don't actually have the need to braze any carbide stuff so didn't fight for it too hard.