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Carbide burr holders?

#1
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Not really a critical need, but how do you guys store carbide burrs and such? I wouldn’t mind having a better solution than just a cardboard box

In my mind a 2-3” tall block of plastic with holes on a grid pattern would be ideal.

Can you buy something like that or am I making something myself?
 

Bofobo

Well-Known Member
#3
I have made some great looking stuff from melting HDPE ( milk jugs, laundry and other jugs, old tool carry cases) basically any colour plaatic container with the #2 recycling symbol, melted in home oven at 350* mixed and pressed into a block then machined. A lot of videos on the you tube. I made a hockey puck stand and a chain guide for my dirt bike. Looks cool but as mentioned a block of wood works to
 
#6
Go a drill press and piece of 2X6 laying around? Sounds like a 1/2 hour project to me.
That’s so simple I don’t know why I didn’t think of that. Paint it whatever colour you want, too

Driving along today I thought it would be neat if someone repurposed something for this. Like take a 5 pound bowling ball, mill a flat spot, drill a bunch of holes and make a hedgehog burr holder

I think someone could have some fun making one! Machine a 3”x3” cube out of aluminum or hard plastic, then drill holes on 5 of the faces, as another idea
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#7
Yup, that's my method. They always seem quick & temporary at the time but somehow they are still in the shop many years later. If you change your mind or add to the series, its not like another block of wood is a big expense or effort. I also have a block for common drill/clearance drills series which gets a lot of use & quick to grab. Like 2-56, 4-40, 6-32...
I like MDF a bit better than grained wood which can tend to distort over time & grip the shanks. You may have to experiment with the drill size for the right fit to go slightly oversize. Thats better than tugging on the sharp end of an end mill. I'm actually thinking of making some blocks for my Dremel tools. I have officially run out of room on my plastic ones that I cant seem to find a source for anymore.
 

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#8
...I like MDF a bit better than grained wood which can tend to distort over time & grip the shanks. You may have to experiment with the drill size for the right fit to go slightly oversize. Thats better than tugging on the sharp end of an end mill. I'm actually thinking of making some blocks for my Dremel tools. I have officially run out of room on my plastic ones that I cant seem to find a source for anymore.
So are those copper-coloured countersinks the 90 degree type? Just the other day, I was thinking that I need to get countersinks better organized. That is a good point about Dremel stuff, too. Centre drills, too.

At an auction, I got a good-size box of plastic blocks. I think I may use some of that for such stands. BTW, another potential issue with wood is moisture. Even very dry wood still has some moisture content. I don't really want to have that in direct contact with the shanks of such bits over the long term.

Craig
 

PeterT

Ultra Member
Premium Member
#10
So are those copper-coloured countersinks the 90 degree type?
Craig
Yes, 90-deg, AliExpress specials. They seem to work OK. Cant tell you how long the miracle coating will last but the edge seems to be holding up in light duty thus far. I find they favor a slower spindle in mild steel.
 
#11
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I scrounged that block of wood last week. I was actually home for more than 10 minutes and got a start on it. It should dry out then sand it down and add some oil, I’m thinking

It’s too long and a little tall but it’s a start